Annelies Bockstael, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, School of audiology and speech pathology
Université de Montréal
annelies.bockstael@umontreal.ca
(514) 343-2082
https://eoa.umontreal.ca/departement/professeurs-chercheurs/annelies-bockstael/

The main focus is interdisciplinary research on auditory processing, attention and cognition.

In 2010, I obtained my doctorate in social sciences of health at the University of Ghent (Belgium) on the improvement of methods of verification and implementation of personal hearing protectors in the workplace. It was a highly interdisciplinary project, supervised by the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences and the Acoustics Research Group (Department of Information and Communications Technology). From 2010 to 2016, I joined the Acoustics Group as a postdoctoral fellow at the Flemish Research Foundation (FWO). There, I worked on the instant effect of sound on hearing and human functioning.

My research focuses on the effects of noise exposure on health, functioning and well-being in real life situations. I am studying this in four different areas: noise-induced hearing loss, environmental noise exposure, the effect of noise on cognition and attention, and specific subgroups that are particularly sensitive to sound and noise, including people with neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. This includes the evaluation of various physiological measurement techniques, such as otoacoustic emissions (OAE, assessment of inner ear function) and electroencephalography (EEG).

I am currently co-supervising a PhD student working on sound volume perception and auditory processing in Parkinson’s disease, and another PhD project that will soon begin in the single-test EEG to assess attention fluctuations in auditory processing.

I consider myself an active member of the scientific community with more than 30 publications in scientific journals and more than 25 contributions to conferences. I received from the University of Ghent the Helmont Prize for Speech and Audiological Sciences in 2013, the Young Scientist Prize (InterNoise 2013) and the Prize for the best student paper at Euronoise 2009. I am also a member of the CEN Standards Working Group, reviewer of various journals in the broad field of acoustics, and have chaired two conferences.

In addition to my scientific work, I am an enthusiastic teacher of various audiology and acoustics courses, and supervise several master’s degree projects in both audiology and engineering each year.