Mathieu Roy, PhD

Mathieu Roy, PhD

Publié par: le 25 février 2019 | Pas de commentaire

We currently have a good understanding of the mechanisms by which noxious stimuli are encoded in the periphery and transmitted to the brain, but little is known about how those nociceptive signals ultimately cause our subjective experience of pain: the age-old mind-body problem! However, for pain this is more than a just philosophical question since an increased understanding of the cerebral mechanisms giving rise to pain could have important implications for treatment. Why do certain people seem to suffer from excruciating pain in the absence of injury? How can certain people tolerate severe pain without taking any pain killers? While certain brain structures may be, perhaps, necessary for experiencing pain, it seems that no single structure is at the same time both necessary and sufficient for pain. Rather, pain seems to emerge from large-scale interactions between several brain regions – the hallmark of consciousness.

My lab and I are tackling these important questions using a variety of brain imaging (MRI, EGG, MEG) and psychological/psychophysiological methods (pain ratings, response times, decision-making, nociceptive flexion reflexes, skin conductance responses, facial EMG, heart rate, cortisol, etc.). Our research projects also span across a more clinically-oriented axis and a more fundamental research axis. Projects with patients with chronic pain investigate topics such as the role of the central nervous system in the effects of physical exercise training on pain, brain predictors of the transition from acute to chronic pain, as well as brain markers of chronic pain and their potential relationships with other genetic and epigenetic markers of chronic pain. Projects in cognitive neuroscience investigate phenomena such as the interactions between pain and cognition, pain and emotions, the effects of music on pain, how we learn to predict and avoid pain, and how we take decisions between and competing rewards.

The effect of music on pain is a topic that has fascinated me since my Ph.D. at UdeM with Isabelle Peretz and Pierre Rainville. We published one of the first experimental studies on the effects of pleasant and unpleasant music on pain (Roy et al., 2008), and I am now starting to renew with this cherished topic. Current and future projects will include manipulations of music-induced analgesia with pharmacological or cognitive-motivational interventions in order to understand the mechanisms mediating the effects of music on pain. We hope that an increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying music-induced analgesia will help improve its efficacy, and favor its adoption in medical settings to the benefit of patients undergoing painful medical procedures or suffering from chronic pain.

Sonja A. Kotz, Ph.D.

Sonja A. Kotz, Ph.D.

Publié par: le 29 novembre 2017 | Pas de commentaire

Sonja A. Kotz is a cognitive, affective and translational neuroscientist who investigates the role of prediction in multimodal domains (perception, action, communication, music) in healthy and clinical populations using behavioural and modern neuroimaging techniques (E/MEG, s/fMRI). She holds a Chair in Translational Cognitive Neuroscience at Maastricht University, multiple honorary positions and professorships (Manchester & Glasgow, UK), Leipzig (Germany), (Georgetown, USA) and is currently the President of the European Society for Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience.

 

The research conducted in her research teams over the last 20 years has been devoted to three core topics: the domain specificity and/or domain generality of music, speech, and prosody, the impact of music on learning, and the impact of music in the rehabilitation of movement and speech/language disorders.

 

Maastricht University / P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands

François Prévost, PhD

François Prévost, PhD

Publié par: le 20 septembre 2016 | Pas de commentaire

François Prévost a obtenu son Ph.D. en neuropsychologie à l’Université de Montréal et a complété sa formation clinique en audiologie à l’Université d’Ottawa. Ses activités de recherche portent sur les processus cognitifs impliqués dans l’analyse de la scène auditive. Ses travaux visent particulièrement les capacités d’attention sélective et de perception de la parole dans le bruit, qu’il étudie au moyen de diverses approches électrophysiologiques (électroencéphalographie, mesures intra-crâniennes). Il s’intéresse également à la plasticité cérébrale observée chez les porteurs d’implants cochléaires. François Prévost est audiologiste au Centre universitaire de santé McGill depuis 2011. Son expertise clinique couvre notamment la réadaptation au moyen d’implants auditifs par conduction osseuse. Il est chargé de cours et instructeur clinique à l’École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie de l’Université de Montréal.

https://cusm.ca/clinique/audiologie-clinique-d-hrv
http://eoa.umontreal.ca/

Alexander Thiel, PhD

Alexander Thiel, PhD

Publié par: le 2 mars 2016 | Pas de commentaire

Dr. Alexander Thiel is Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University. As a stroke neurologist, he is Director of the Neuroplasticity Research Program at the Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research (LDI) and Director of the Stroke Unit at the Jewish General Hospital (JGH).

Rushen Shi, PhD

Rushen Shi, PhD

Publié par: le 17 juillet 2015 | Pas de commentaire

Rushen Shi’s research group focuses on fundamental questions in child language. Their research questions include how infants and young children acquire their linguistic representations, such as the development of phonetic categories, early word recognition, the learning of meaning, and initial acquisition of morpho-syntactic structures. They attempt to understand the mechanisms underlying language acquisition and the interaction between the input and the grammar.

 

Link to laboratory: http://www.gr.uqam.ca

Bruno Gauthier, PhD

Bruno Gauthier, PhD

Publié par: le 15 juillet 2015 | Pas de commentaire

Bruno Gauthier est professeur adjoint au département de psychologie de l’Université de Montréal. Il s’intéresse à l’acquisition du langage et au développement de la perception et de la production de la parole chez l’enfant.

Son programme de recherche vise à mieux comprendre le développement neuropsychologique normal et atypique chez l’enfant et l’adolescent. Il vise plus précisément à :

  • développer et valider des méthodes d’évaluation et d’intervention auprès d’enfants qui présentent des troubles neurodéveloppementaux, incluant les troubles de l’attention, les troubles d’apprentissage (dyslexie, dyscalculie) et le syndrome de Tourette;
  • développer et valider des méthodes d’analyse et d’interprétation de données neuropsychologiques, et
  • modéliser les processus cognitifs par le biais de réseaux de neurones artificiels.
Ingrid Verduyckt, PhD

Ingrid Verduyckt, PhD

Publié par: le 16 juin 2015 | Pas de commentaire

Ingrid Verduyckt est professeure adjointe à l’école d’orthophonie et d’audiologie de l’UdeM. Elle a obtenu un Master en orthophonie à l’Université de Lund en Suède, et un doctorat en Sciences psychologiques et de l’éducation à L’Université Catholique de Louvain en Belgique. Ses intérêts de recherches concernent les mécanismes pathologiques impliqués dans les troubles vocaux bénins. Sur le plan de la production vocale, elle s’intéresse à l’impact des émotions sur le contrôle moteur vocal, et aux liens entre comportement vocal et personnalité du locuteur. Sur le plan perceptif, elle s’intéresse à l’impact d’une détérioration vocale sur l’image sociale véhiculée par le locuteur.

Miriam Beauchamp, PhD

Miriam Beauchamp, PhD

Publié par: le 24 mars 2015 | Pas de commentaire

Miriam Beauchamp, PhD is Assistant Professor in developmental neuropsychology at the University of Montreal (Canada) where she leads the ABCs developmental neuropsychology laboratory (www.abcs.umontreal.ca). She is also a researcher at the Ste-Justine Hospital Research Center and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University. Between 2006-2009 she completed CIHR-funded post-doctoral training at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with Dr. Vicki Anderson. In 2009 she received a Career Development Award from the Quebec Health Resarch Funds (FRQS) for her research program in pediatric traumatic brain injury. In 2015, she was presented with the International Neuropsychological Society Early Career Award in recognition of her work in the area of pediatric traumatic brain injury. The work conducted in her lab focuses globally on cerebral, cognitive and social development from infancy, through childhood and adolescence. Her clinical research program focuses specifically on studying advanced neuroimaging techniques for improving lesion detection after childhood traumatic brain injury and measuring cognitive and social outcomes. The information gleaned from her work informs the development of novel social cognition assessment methods and targeted interventions for children at-risk for cognitive, social or behavioural problems.

Gilles Comeau, PhD

Gilles Comeau, PhD

Publié par: le 12 août 2014 | Pas de commentaire

Fondateur et directeur du Laboratoire de recherche en pédagogie du piano, une infrastructure de recherche qui regroupe des chercheurs de plusieurs disciplines qui s’intéressent à l’apprentissage du jeu pianistique.

Mes intérêts de recherche :

  • L’apprentissage de la lecture musicale
  • Les aspects physiologiques du jeu pianistique
  • Problèmes de santé liés au jeu pianistique
  • La motivation et l’apprentissage d’un  instrument de musique
Sylvie Nozaradan, PhD

Sylvie Nozaradan, PhD

Publié par: le 1 avril 2014 | Pas de commentaire

Sylvie Nozaradan est présentement une post-doctorante (chargée de recherche) à l’Institut de Neuroscience, UCL en Belgique.  Elle possède une maîtrise en piano ainsi qu’un diplôme en médecine.    Elle a également complété son PhD en Neurosciences en co-direction avec les Drs. Isabelle Peretz & André Mouraux.  L’Axe de recherche qu’elle développe plus indépendamment, dans la continuité de son Ph.D. consiste au développement d’une approche expérimental nouvelle, inspirée d’une méthode de potentiel évoqué d’un état stable.