BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Simha Arom & Robert Kaddouch
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Simha Arom & Robert Kaddouch

Posted by: on Apr 15, 2020 | No Comments

Polyphony – Systematics and Ontogenesis

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Mickael Deroche
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Mickael Deroche

Posted by: on Mar 26, 2020 | No Comments

Exploration of brain plasticity in children with cochlear implants using electroencephalography and functional near-infrared spectroscopy

Abstract: Cochlear implants restore a sense of hearing to profoundly deaf individuals. For children who were born deaf, these devices have proven incredibly useful: many acquire spoken language relatively normally and enter mainstream schools. However, global outcomes in terms of academic achievements differ widely between children and we are trying to understand why, by looking at their brain. In this project, we recruited over 50 children (grade 3 to 12), implanted early in life (20 months old) or slightly later (30 months). Along with audiological assessments, all children completed a battery of tests to evaluate their language skills and their reading skills. Furthermore, we recorded their cortical activity using (sequentially) EEG and fNIRS in response to 1) visual processing (checkerboard and visual speech), 2) auditory processing (oddball noises and auditory speech), 3) somatosensory/motor processing (joystick with/without vibration), 4) multi-sensory processing (audiovisual speech and words/nonwords reading and listening), and 5) resting state networks and connectivity (inscapes, or emotional video clip). This presentation will review our findings to date, highlighting evidence for maladaptive cross-modal plasticity caused by a delayed age at (first) implantation.

Short bio: Dr. Deroche is interested in hearing and cognition, using behavioral and neurophysiological techniques. He is originally from France, coming from an engineering background in acoustics. In 2009, he completed his PhD in Cardiff University studying the use of pitch in cocktail-party situations. From 2010 to 2015, he worked at the University of Maryland and at Johns Hopkins, documenting the challenges that users of cochlear implants face with pitch perception and how they translate into further deficits in music and language. In 2015, he moved to Montreal and worked in different centers on a number of projects spanning auditory masking, emotion processing, sensorimotor integration, cognitive load and short-term memory in listeners with impoverished hearing and other populations of interest (musicianship, stuttering). As of 2019, he is Assistant Professor in the Psychology Department at Concordia University. His laboratory investigates processing of speech and music, in healthy and pathological hearing.

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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : STUDENT ACTIVITY – Journal Club discussion of an article

Posted by: on Feb 19, 2020 | No Comments

Discussion on Cowen, Alan S., et al. « What music makes us feel: At least 13 dimensions organize subjective experiences associated with music across different cultures » Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2020).

Please see the  article that will be featured during the discussion next week.  Please ensure to read the article prior to the activity for an active participation !

Abstract : What is the nature of the feelings evoked by music? We investigated how people represent the subjective experiences associated with Western and Chinese music and the form in which these representational processes are preserved across different cultural groups. US (n = 1,591) and Chinese (n = 1,258) participants listened to 2,168 music samples and reported on the specific feelings (e.g., “angry,” “dreamy”) or broad affective features (e.g., valence, arousal) that they made individuals feel. Using large-scale statistical tools, we uncovered 13 distinct types of subjective experience associated with music in both cultures. Specific feelings such as “triumphant” were better preserved across the 2 cultures than levels of valence and arousal, contrasting with theoretical claims that valence and arousal are building blocks of subjective experience. This held true even for music selected on the basis of its valence and arousal levels and for traditional Chinese music. Furthermore, the feelings associated with music were found to occupy continuous gradients, contradicting discrete emotion theories. Our findings, visualized within an interactive map (https://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/ ∼acowen/music.html) reveal a complex, high-dimensional space of subjective experience associated with music in multiple cultures. These findings can inform inquiries ranging from the etiology of affective disorders to the neurological basis of emotion.

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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : STUDENT ACTIVITY – Journal Club discussion of an article

Posted by: on Feb 12, 2020 | No Comments

Discussion on Sala, G. & Gobet, F. (2020) Cognitive and academic benefits of music training with children: A multilevel meta-analysis

Please see the controversial article that will be featured during the discussion next week.  Please ensure to read the article prior to the activity for an active participation !

Electrophysiology study on tinnitus

Posted by: on Feb 4, 2020 | No Comments

We are currently recruiting adults who meet the following criteria;

  •      be in good health
  •      be a woman of 34 to 36 years old
  •      NOT have tinnitus
  •      not have severe deafness in any of the ears

For more information, please contact Olivia Scully or Charlotte Bigras at the following address: brams.etude.ga@gmail.com 

Study supervised by Sylvie Hébert, Full Professor, School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Montreal  Sylvie.hebert@umontreal.ca

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Noémie Auclair Ouellet
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Noémie Auclair Ouellet

Posted by: on Jan 29, 2020 | No Comments

Morphosyntactic difficulties in acquired language disorders and their relationship with rhythm processing

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Dr. Frank Russo

Posted by: on Jan 23, 2020 | No Comments

SingWell Canada: Understanding group singing in older adults from a biopsychosocial perspective

Frank Russo BRAMS Lecture.mp4

 

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Claire Pelofi
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Claire Pelofi

Posted by: on Jan 22, 2020 | No Comments

Cortical tracking of high-level properties of music

BRAMS – Mitacs Scholarships Submission

Posted by: on Jan 15, 2020 | No Comments

BRAMS, in collaboration with Mitacs, is offering  5 Globalink MITACS-BRAMS research scholarships for foreign students on projects related to artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, or data science and music.

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Postdoc Presentations by Dr. Sébastien Paquette and Dr. Bastien Intartaglia
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Postdoc Presentations by Dr. Sébastien Paquette and Dr. Bastien Intartaglia

Posted by: on Dec 4, 2019 | No Comments

Dr. Sébastien Paquette: Decoding Auditory Emotions 

Dr. Bastien Intartaglia: The effect of language and musical experience on neural processing of sounds