BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Simha Arom & Robert Kaddouch
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Simha Arom & Robert Kaddouch

Posted by: on Apr 15, 2020 | No Comments

Polyphony – Systematics and Ontogenesis

Abstract:  To produce a melody is one thing; to couple it with a second one is yet another; but to create unity between several different parts at the same time is a major problem that has called for solutions in different historical epochs and in various cultural contexts.

Polyphony – the simultaneous unfolding of several voices – is precisely the art of making different melodic sequences coexist as a whole, which transcends each one of them separately, while preserving its own individuality.

It is fascinating to observe how, across places, eras and cultures, men have used similar polyphonic techniques.

Through comparative listening, we will identify polyphonic processes common to different musical heritages, chosen independently of epochs and geographical areas. We will discover unsuspected kinships, particularly between the polyphonies of the Pygmies of Central Africa and those composed in Europe in the Middle Ages, as well as between the traditional polyphonies of Georgia and those of the early Renaissance.

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After Simha Arom’s presentation involving comparative listening to various polyphonic processes common to different forms of musical heritage, chosen independently of the time periods, geographical areas and modes of transmission (written or oral), Robert Kaddouch will comment on videos of very young children (between eight months and six years old) in improvisation situations during which they spontaneously draw on some of these processes. The concept of conductibility will shed light on these manifestations.

Short bio:  Simha Arom: A French-Israeli ethnomusicologist who is recognized as a world expert on the music of central Africa, especially that of the Central African Republic. His books include African Polyphony and Polyrhythm: Musical Structure and Methodology (1991). In the 1960s, Simha Arom was sent by the Government of Israel to establish a brass band in the Central African Republic. He became fascinated by the traditional music of this country, especially the vocal polyphonies of the Aka Pygmies. He did field work every year from 1971 to 1991, accompanied by ethnolinguists and students, to record this music to study it and preserve it. Simha Arom was awarded a First Prize for French Horn at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique of Paris before becoming an ethnomusicologist. Further research interests: Ethnomusicological methodology, the liturgical music traditions of Ethiopian Jews and the musical heritage of the Jews of Djerba. Arom has been a Visiting Professor at many universities around the world. He is also a member of the Société française de musicologie and the Board of directors of The Universe of Music project (UNESCO). His sound archives were deposited in 2011 at the sound library of the Bibliothèque nationale de France.

Robert Kaddouch is a pianist and a pedagogue. He is the creator of the “Kaddouch Pedagogy” based on the concept of “Conductivity” (The Pedagogue and the Philosopher, Robert Kaddouch and Conductibility, Paris: Harmattan.) He was a student of Pierre Sancan and Bruno Rigutto for the piano, of Iannis Xenakis for composition and of Martial Solal for improvisation; as a pianist he played and recorded with Martial Solal ,Chuck Israels, Gary Peacock , Eddie Gomez …He has been giving courses to teachers and instructors in different disciplines at multiple schools in different countries, and he has collaborated with various research teams (Paris Descartes, Sorbonne, Neurospin, ENS Nicot Institute). He has published several practical and theoretical works, including: Kaddouch, R. & Noulhiane, M., The Child, Music and Memory, De Boeck, 2013; Des Mimes et des Murs, Gruppen, 2012.

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Postdoc Presentations by Dr. Sébastien Paquette and Dr. Bastien Intartaglia
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Postdoc Presentations by Dr. Sébastien Paquette and Dr. Bastien Intartaglia

Posted by: on Dec 4, 2019 | No Comments

Dr. Sébastien Paquette: Decoding Auditory Emotions 

Abstract: Many studies support the idea of common neural substrates for the perception of vocal and musical emotions. It is proposed that music, to make us perceive emotions, recruits the emotional circuits that evolved mainly for the processing of biologically relevant vocalizations (e.g., cries, screams). Although some studies have found great similarities between voice and music in terms of acoustic cues (emotional expression) and neural correlates (emotional processing), some studies reported differences specific to each medium. However, it is possible that the differences described may not be specific to the medium, but may instead be specific to the stimuli used (e.g., complexity, length). To understand how these vocal and musical emotions are perceived and how they can be affected by hearing impairments, we assessed recognition of the most basic forms of auditory emotion (musical/vocal bursts) through a series of studies in normal-hearing individuals and cochlear implant users.

Short bio: Sebastien received his Ph.D. in Psychology from Université de Montréal and just came back to Montréal after completing a postdoc in the Music, Stroke Recovery, and Neuroimaging Laboratory. He is now a post-doc in Dr. Alexandre Lehmann’s laboratory. His work focuses on the auditory perception of music and voice and how it can be utilized for rehabilitation.

Dr. Bastien Intartaglia: The effect of language and musical experience on neural processing of sounds

Abstract: Listening to sounds from our environment is a process that is shaped by our auditory experience (e.g. native language, musical practice…). Recent work mainly focused on the effect of auditory experience on the neural processing of sounds comparing speakers of tonal and non-tonal languages that use pitch variations to convey phonemic categories (e.g. English VS Chinese Mandarin respectively). The aim of our work was to determine whether subcortical encoding of speech sounds is sensitive to language experience by comparing native speakers of two non-tonal languages (French and English) and whether this difference in language experience could be compensated by musical practice by comparing musicians and non-musicians neural responses to non-native speech sounds.

Short bio: Bastien got his Ph.D. in Neurosciences from Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France. He is now a post-doc research fellow at Dr. Alexandre Lehmann’s lab. His work focuses on auditory perception and attention using EEG.

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Postdoc Presentation by Dr. Felipe Verdugo
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Postdoc Presentation by Dr. Felipe Verdugo

Posted by: on Nov 27, 2019 | No Comments

Physiological, mechanical, and music-related features of pianists’ gestures

Abstract: Piano performance involves different levels of motor abundancy: similar piano tones might be produced by an unlimited quantity of motion possibilities of all the body segments integrating the kinematic chain. Due to motor abundancy and the aesthetic and cultural factors underlying composers and performers’ artistic work, several approaches to piano performance currently coexist. According to a specific approach to piano performance developed at Université de Montréal, pianists might both reduce risks of practice-related injuries and facilitate the embodiment of the expressive content of music by using elliptic upper-limb movements as well as motion and muscular activity of the pelvis and the thorax. Building on the experiential knowledge of this approach, an ongoing research project investigates pianists’ gestures from a multi-disciplinary perspective integrating fields such as biomechanics, acoustics, music technology, and music performance. This project aims to produce scientifically-grounded knowledge that might serve as a complement to the existing experiential knowledge of pianists and pedagogues in order to foster future development and dissemination of healthy, efficient, and music-oriented motion strategies. In this lecture, I will present methods and results from several studies carried out in the context of the mentioned project. These studies address issues such as joint contribution to finger and hand velocities, variability of both pianists’ kinematics and muscular activity, muscular fatigue during repetitive excerpts, and relationships between muscular activity and musical tension.

Short Bio: Felipe Verdugo pursues a diversified career as a pianist, pedagogue, and researcher. He obtained his Doctor of Music degree at Université de Montréal (UdeM), where he teaches piano performance as a lecturer since 2016. He is currently attached as a postdoctoral fellow at the CIRMMT (McGill University) and the EXPRESSION team (Université Bretagne-Sud, France) thanks to a postdoctoral scholarship from both the SSHRC and the FRQSC. Interested in the biomechanical features of piano performance in the context of his doctoral research, he worked in 2018 and 2019 as a postdoctoral fellow at the Laboratoire de simulation et modélisation du movement (École de kinesiologie et des sciences de l’activité physique, UdeM). He has performed among others as a soloist with the Orchestre de l’Université de Montréal after winning first prize at UdeM concerto competition and has presented his research work in lectures and lecture-recitals at international conferences such as the London International Piano Symposium (UK). In addition, he completed a Master’s degree in political science at Université du Québec à Montréal and was awarded the Institut de recherche en économie contemporaine prize for the best 2018 master thesis.

 

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Eldad Tsabary
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Eldad Tsabary

Posted by: on Nov 20, 2019 | No Comments

Sound-focused aural training with Inner Ear 

Abstract: Inner Ear is a SSHRC-funded multi-university research-creation project for developing an accessible, adaptive ear training tool geared toward musicians and audio engineers working in the various sound fields. The design of this software builds on a decade-long, ongoing, action research study with music students who major in electroacoustic studies. The objective of the research has been to understand the student’s aural skill acquisition process and subsequently develop comprehensive tools to facilitate rapid refinement of skills which are crucial to all sound-focused art. This tool provides users with quick, interactive feedback and engages their critical thinking regarding the skill acquisition process. Students who practiced their sonic hearing with Inner Ear at Concordia University report radical changes to their everyday hearing experience and a growing “fascination with small sounds occurring in all situations.” Students often also report some annoyance with their heightened aural awareness and their lost ability to ignore unpleasant sound in their environment (however, all note that the positive transformation outweighs the negative effects). In this lecture I will engage the audience with Inner Ear’s training modules; describe the functional and research contexts that lead to its creation; and cover the basic principles behind its design, transformational strength, and relevance to sound practices and our daily hearing.

Short bio: Dr. Eldad Tsabary is the coordinator of electroacoustic studies at Concordia University’s Department of Music. In the past decade, Eldad has spearheaded research and development of a sound-focused aural training method for electroacoustic musicians, which is informed by perception studies and is built on a transformational, democratic educational model. He is founder and director of Concordia Laptop Orchestra (CLOrk) which specializes in collective improvisation and interdisciplinary collaborative performances in which students function as co-creators/co-researchers. Notable CLOrk performances include a collaboration with pop star Ariane Moffat at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (MAC) and a performance in Akousma festival at Usine C. Eldad received his doctorate in music education from Boston University. Previously, Eldad has been president of the Canadian Electroacoustic Community (CEC) 2013-2019 and coordinator (2018-2019) of the Faculty of Fine Arts’ Interdisciplinary Studies area. Tsabary’s main areas of expertise are in the domain of sound studies: specifically (a) sonic aural training and (b) live electroacoustic performance. Through these areas of inquiry, Tsabary has been developing educational approaches, tools, and strategies to better-understand and transform the diverse internal processes involved in sound perception, organization, and creation—both individually and collectively within an ensemble. Through cyclical, ground-up, collaborative research projects, Tsabary has been seeking ways to adapt the educational environment to emerging contexts, goals, and ways of knowing and learning among individuals (of various cultural and neurodiverse backgrounds). Eldad is also deeply engaged in EDI activism; through chairing a Decolonization in the Arts and Humanities conference in Southeast Asia; through involvement in curricular design of a new Major in Sexuality Studies at Concordia’s Simone de Beauvoir Institute; and through collaborative intersectional activism in Concordia’s Electroacoustic Studies area.

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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Postdoc Presentations by Dr. Razieh Alemi and Dr. Anastasia Sares

Posted by: on Nov 13, 2019 | No Comments

Dr. Razieh Alemi: How cochlear implant users control their voice pitch?

Abstract:  Oral communication development relies on auditory feedback, enabling speakers to regulate voice parameters and preserve speech fluency. This sensorimotor integration is hindered by hearing loss. Cochlear implants (CIs) restore the sense of hearing, but whether CI users can re-establish a functional perception-production loop is unknown. Notably, some devices aim to reproduce finer details in fundamental frequency (F0). Here we asked whether F0 details provided by these devices can enhance hearing feedback and, hence, quality of oral production.

Short Bio: Razieh got her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, Iran. Currently, she is a post-doc research fellow at Dr. Alexandre Lehmann’s lab.

Dr. Anastasia Sares: The pitch compensation response in individuals who stutter

Abstract: It has been proposed that stuttering, a disorder characterized by repetitions and prolongations of speech sounds, may be related to differences in sensorimotor integration. One way to probe sensorimotor integration is to measure responses to altered auditory feedback. This experiment was a vocal pitch compensation paradigm where participants sustained a vowel while hearing their own voice through headphones in real time. Intermittently during the vocalization, the feedback they heard was pitch-shifted up or down. In agreement with previous studies, participants reflexively changed the pitch of their voice in order to counteract the shifted pitch. Adults with a stutter had a smaller average response than fluent speakers, and further analyses showed that the timing of their responses was also more variable. These results suggest that sensorimotor integration in adults who stutter, even for tasks focused on pitch, may be influenced by differences temporal processing. 

Short Bio: Anastasia Sares earned her PhD from McGill University, studying the neural underpinnings of stuttering through behavior and fMRI. She is broadly interested in auditory cognitive neuroscience, especially for complex phenomena like language and music.

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Dr. Frank Russo
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Dr. Frank Russo

Posted by: on Nov 6, 2019 | No Comments

SingWell Canada: Understanding group singing in older adults from a biopsychosocial perspective

Abstract: Many older adults face formidable challenges to social wellbeing. Foremost among these is the social isolation and loneliness that may arise from a combination of factors inclusive of retirement from work, increased physical distance from family, and the death of loved ones. Another prominent challenge to social wellbeing concerns stigma, often involving self-stereotyping whereby an individual internalizes commonly held negative characterizations of aging or aging-associated diseases as part of their social identity. SingWell Canada (https://www.singwell.ca) is a SSHRC-funded partnership development grant that aims to investigate the potential for choir singing to support social wellbeing in older adults living with age-associated diseases (Parkinson’s, Lung Disease, Dementia, Aphasia, Hearing Loss) as well as those who are in good health. We are currently tracking 15 newly formed choirs across Canada. A second aim of this project is to clarify the sociobiological underpinnings of any benefits to social wellbeing. Our results at the year-1 mark of this program of research suggest that group singing leads to increased social connectedness and reduced stigma. Pre-post session effects typically show increases in oxytocin and pain thresholds, and decreases in cortisol. Comparisons with control conditions suggest that some of these pre-post effects are driven by singing alone, while others arise as a function of group dynamics.

Short bio: Frank Russo is a professor of Psychology at Ryerson University, where he holds the Hear the World Research Chair in Music and Emotional Speech. He also holds status appointments in Rehabilitation Science and Music at the University of Toronto, and as an affiliate scientist at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. In his Science of Music Auditory Research and Technology (SMART) Lab at Ryerson, he studies the biological, cognitive, and social-emotional bases of music and speech. He also engages in two related areas of applied research. The first area seeks to understand perception of listening effort, music, and speech emotion in hearing impaired older adults. The second area assesses the potential for music-based interventions (especially singing) to contribute to health, communication and wellbeing. He is committed to the dissemination and translation of research beyond the academy through creative collaborations with community-based groups and industry. Successful translations of his research include a Canadian train-horn standard, a sensory substitution technology, new algorithms to support music perception through hearing aids, and the development of singing interventions to support communication deficits. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association and Massey College, and is a past president of the Canadian Acoustical Association.

 

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Postdoc Presentation by Dr. Michael Weiss
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Postdoc Presentation by Dr. Michael Weiss

Posted by: on Oct 30, 2019 | No Comments

The influence of vocal timbre on learning and memory for melodies

Abstract:  The voice is a dynamic, biologically relevant signal. It is also the “original” instrument. Nevertheless, the voice is more difficult to manipulate or control than other instruments, especially digital ones, and studies of music perception and cognition do not typically include vocal stimuli. The aim of this talk is to explore the effects of vocal timbre on music perception and cognition, with a focus on learning and memory for melodies. I will present results that show enhanced recognition for vocal melodies over instrumental melodies across diverse groups of listeners, and explore the origins of this widespread ’vocal advantage’.

Short Bio: Michael is a postdoctoral fellow at the International Laboratory for Brain, Music, and Sound Research at the University of Montreal in Canada. His research focuses on music perception and cognition.

CONFÉRENCE D’OUVERTURE AVEC DRE ISABELLE PERETZ
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CONFÉRENCE D’OUVERTURE AVEC DRE ISABELLE PERETZ

Posted by: on Oct 24, 2019 | No Comments

CONGRÈS FAMEQ 2019 – LES 23, 24 et 25 OCTOBRE

En collaboration avec le Département de Musique de l’UQAM  🎶

CONFÉRENCE D’OUVERTURE AVEC MME ISABELLE PERETZ

Le Congrès Fameq est extrêmement fier d’accueillir Mme Isabelle Peretz pour sa Conférence d’ouverture
à la salle Pierre-Mercure le jeudi 24 octobre de 8h30 à 10h. boulevard De Maisonneuve Est, Montréal (Québec) H2X 3X6., Métro Berri UQAM

CONFÉRENCE OUVERTE À TOUS ET GRATUITE!

« Ma conférence vous présente en fait mon livre : « Apprendre la musique. Nouvelles des neurosciences », paru chez Odile Jacob (France) en mai 2018. Dans ce livre, j’expose comment la musique modifie le cerveau. J’envisage les bases innées de la musicalité, en couvrant la période critique, les différences individuelles, l’hérédité, l’oreille absolue, le prodige et son inverse : l’amusique. Ensuite, j’aborde des activités musicales à saveur sociale, comme le chant et la danse. Enfin, je discute des fondements de l’apprentissage de la musique et je conclus sur les possibilités d’application de ce savoir scientifique en éducation musicale. »

Professeure au Département de psychologie de l’Université de Montréal, elle est titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en neurocognition de la musique et de la Chaire Casavant en neuropsychologie et cognition musicale. Elle est cofondatrice et membre du Laboratoire international de recherche sur le cerveau, la musique et le son.

Les recherches de la professeure Peretz ont pour point central les processus cognitifs en jeu dans les activités musicales. Elle a notamment démontré les fondements biologiques de la musique, le fait que celle-ci repose sur des bases neurologiques et cognitives pouvant être étudiées en laboratoire.

Dans ses travaux, elle aborde également la compréhension fine du potentiel musical de la population en général. Mme Peretz a ouvert la voie de la «neurocognition » de la musique et en a fait un champ disciplinaire effervescent. Grâce à elle, Montréal est aujourd’hui la capitale mondiale de l’étude du «cerveau musical».

Site web: www.peretzlab.ca

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Philippe Albouy
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Philippe Albouy

Posted by: on Oct 16, 2019 | No Comments

Enhancing executive functions through information-based neuromodulation

Abstract: Executive functions, such as working memory, are essential cognitives processes for our everyday life activities. When such functions are disrupted due to age-related or pathology-related cognitive decline, life becomes increasingly difficult and isolating. For those reasons, a large amount of studies have used non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) to enhance those functions in healthy individuals and neurological population. However, the outcomes have been considerably variable and the neurophysiological mechanisms by which these methods work, or why they sometimes fail, remain largely unknown. We believe that such uncertainty is due to the non-specific nature of the NIBS interventions, as they are not based on a proper understanding of the targeted brain mechanisms. I will present our recent studies showing that NIBS interventions can be optimized/personalized, by using stimulation parameters that match functionally relevant brain activity (information-based NIBS). I will show that brain oscillations, which consist in rhythmic fluctuations of brain activity, can be elected as pertinent signal targets for NIBS interventions. Furthermore, I will propose that the combination of information-based NIBS and longitudinal behavioral intervention (such as cognitive training) might be an ideal procedure to enhance cognitive functions.

Short bio: Dr. Philippe Albouy is an assistant professor at the psychology department of Laval University, a regular researcher at CERVO Brain Research Centre (Quebec city) and a FRQ-S Junior 1 Scholar. He received his PhD in Neuroscience in 2013 from Lyon 1 University (France) where he used multimodal neuroimaging approaches (MEG, fMRI, EEG, iEEG) to study the brain dynamics related to auditory perception and working memory in humans. In 2014, he joined the Montreal Neurological Institute of McGill University, first as a Fyssen, then as a Banting postdoctoral Fellow in Pr Robert Zatorre’s and Pr Sylvain Baillet’s groups. His work focuses in the identification of the causal links between the dynamics of neural activity and human cognitive functions. In his research he combines multimodal neuroimaging data and information-based neuromodulation methods (i.e., online TMS/visual stimulation configured to match specific ongoing spatiotemporal patterns of neural activity) with the aim of causally enhancing cognitive abilities in health and disease. His overarching interests are in the translational impact of such optimized neuromodulation approaches as personalized therapeutic tools and preventive solutions for pathology-associated neurocognitive deficits.

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Dr. Bill Thompson
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Dr. Bill Thompson

Posted by: on Oct 9, 2019 | No Comments

Music and intercultural understanding

Abstract: Music is a powerful stimulus for wellbeing and interpersonal connection and is increasingly applied to promote intercultural understanding.  Yet there is little understanding of the social and psychological processes by which music has such effects. The aim of this talk is to consider the psychosocial impact and psychological underpinnings of music when used to address the challenges of people who are marginalised or stigmatised, and to promote social cohesion and intercultural understanding in multicultural societies.