CRBLM Scientific Day
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CRBLM Scientific Day

Posted by: on May 13, 2019 | No Comments

 

SAVE THE DATE

The 2019 CRBLM Scientific Day will be held in May. The keynote speaker has been confirmed as Kate Watkins, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Oxford. More details to follow!

1st CIRMMT-OICRM-BRAMS Student Symposium
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1st CIRMMT-OICRM-BRAMS Student Symposium

Posted by: on May 9, 2019 | No Comments

For more information, visit the event page: CIRMMT-OICRM-BRAMS Student Symposium

The student committees of the CIRMMT, OICRM, and BRAMS invite you to their very first interuniversity, interdisciplinary student symposium, uniting members of the three research centers around the theme “Encounters, Collaborations and Interdisciplinarity in Music Research”. The symposium will take place in Montreal (location to be confirmed). The deadline for submission is March 8th For more information, please see attached PDF Call-for-papers_CCBS-CCOB[4545].

UPDATE: The CIRMMT-BRAMS-OICRM Symposium application deadline for POSTERS presentations ONLY is extended until March 17th !

BRAMS – Talk by Séverine Samson
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BRAMS – Talk by Séverine Samson

Posted by: on Apr 24, 2019 | No Comments

Music synchronization and social interaction in Alzheimer disease

Abstract: Multitudes of studies support that musical interventions in patients with neurodegenerative studies, in particular with Alzheimer’s disease, positively affect various domains of their wellbeing – emotional, cognitive, and behavioural – and, also reduce the distress of caregivers. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unclear.  In this presentation, I will propose the idea that rhythmic entrainment induced by listening to music, including synchronized movements with musical rhythms, might contribute to the efficacy of music-based interventions in these patients. I will also discuss how aligned actions to rhythmic sounds could be modulated by the presence of a partner, and more generally by the social environment suggesting a link between synchronization to musical rhythm and interpersonal coordination. Finally, I will present a method to measure rhythmic entrainment in elderly that could be used in future researches to increase the intervention efficacy in pathological aging.

Bio: Séverine Samson is a cognitive neuropsychologist and a professor of psychology at the University of Lille in France and is in charge of the pre-surgical neuropsychological evaluation of epileptic patients in an Epilepsy unit (Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris). In Lille, she developed neuropsychology training programs specialized in cognitive rehabilitation. Her research focuses on the neurobiological bases of perception, memory and emotion using methods from cognitive psychology, neuropsychology, psychophysiology and neuroimaging. More specifically, she used music as a framework for understanding the functioning of human memory and emotions. This evolution has led her to experimentally investigate potential therapeutic applications of music in the rehabilitation of cognitive and affective disorders.  She addresses her research questions by analysing different neuropathologies of epileptic, degenerative, developmental and sensory origin. The multi-disciplinary approach used combines clinical research with the experimental rigor of basic research, at the interface of art, science and cognition.

 

 

Talk by Samuel Mehr “A natural history of song”
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Talk by Samuel Mehr “A natural history of song”

Posted by: on Apr 15, 2019 | No Comments

A natural history of song

Theories of the origins of music claim that the music faculty is shaped by the functional design of the human mind. On these ideas, musical behavior and musical structure are expected to exhibit species-wide regularities: music should be characterized by human universals. Many cognitive and evolutionary scientists intuitively accept this idea but no one has any good evidence for it. Most scholars of music, in contrast, intuitively accept the opposite position, citing the staggering diversity of the world’s music as evidence that music is shaped mostly by culture. I will present two papers that attempt to resolve this debate. The first, a pair of experiments, shows that the musical forms of songs in 86 cultures are shaped by their social functions (Mehr & Singh et al., 2018, Current Biology). The second, a descriptive project, applies tools of computational social science to the recently-created Natural History of Song corpora (http://naturalhistoryofsong.org) to demonstrate universals and dimensions of variation in musical behaviors and musical forms (Mehr et al., working paper, https://psyarxiv.com/emq8r).

Samuel Mehr is a Research Associate in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University, where he directs the Music Lab. Sam studies music: how the design of the human mind leads us to perceive, create, and engage with music, and how this psychology of music may be leveraged to improve health outcomes in infancy and adulthood. These questions are multidisciplinary, drawing insights from the cognitive sciences, evolutionary biology, anthropology, ethnomusicology and music theory, linguistics, and computer science. Originally a musician, Sam earned a B.M. in Music Education from the Eastman School of Music before diving into science at Harvard, where he earned an Ed.D. in Human Development and Education under the mentorship of Howard Gardner, Elizabeth Spelke, and Steven Pinker. To learn more about Sam’s research and to participate in music research online, please visit http://themusiclab.org.

Talk by Samuel Mehr “A natural history of song”
In

Talk by Samuel Mehr “A natural history of song”

Posted by: on Apr 15, 2019 | No Comments

Pavilion Marie-Victorin, Room D-451

A natural history of song

Theories of the origins of music claim that the music faculty is shaped by the functional design of the human mind. On these ideas, musical behavior and musical structure are expected to exhibit species-wide regularities: music should be characterized by human universals. Many cognitive and evolutionary scientists intuitively accept this idea but no one has any good evidence for it. Most scholars of music, in contrast, intuitively accept the opposite position, citing the staggering diversity of the world’s music as evidence that music is shaped mostly by culture. I will present two papers that attempt to resolve this debate. The first, a pair of experiments, shows that the musical forms of songs in 86 cultures are shaped by their social functions (Mehr & Singh et al., 2018, Current Biology). The second, a descriptive project, applies tools of computational social science to the recently-created Natural History of Song corpora (http://naturalhistoryofsong.org) to demonstrate universals and dimensions of variation in musical behaviors and musical forms (Mehr et al., working paper, https://psyarxiv.com/emq8r).

Samuel Mehr is a Research Associate in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University, where he directs the Music Lab. Sam studies music: how the design of the human mind leads us to perceive, create, and engage with music, and how this psychology of music may be leveraged to improve health outcomes in infancy and adulthood. These questions are multidisciplinary, drawing insights from the cognitive sciences, evolutionary biology, anthropology, ethnomusicology and music theory, linguistics, and computer science. Originally a musician, Sam earned a B.M. in Music Education from the Eastman School of Music before diving into science at Harvard, where he earned an Ed.D. in Human Development and Education under the mentorship of Howard Gardner, Elizabeth Spelke, and Steven Pinker. To learn more about Sam’s research and to participate in music research online, please visit http://themusiclab.org.

13ième Journée scientifique du Département de psychologie
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13ième Journée scientifique du Département de psychologie

Posted by: on Apr 3, 2019 | No Comments

Le BRAMS sera un partenaire de la journée scientifique annuelle de la Université de Montréal. La Journée scientifique annuelle se veut une occasion pour les étudiants de s’initier au monde des congrès et conférences scientifiques. Chaque année, plus de 400 étudiants y participent, et plus d’une centaine d’étudiants y présentent leurs travaux de recherche. Des conférenciers spéciaux sont invités à tous les ans. Cet année Margaret E. Morris, Chercheure senior, Intel, Professeur associée, Department of human centered design and engineering, University of Washington est la conférencière invitée. Pour plus d’informations sur sa conférence “Left to our own devices: technology insights from a clinical psychologist“, SVP voir le PDF ci-joint Margie_Morris_-_Annonce.

Concordia Music Therapy student visit
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Concordia Music Therapy student visit

Posted by: on Mar 28, 2019 | No Comments

Stephen Venkatarangam, music therapist, who is teaching Psychology of Music at Concordia, will be visiting BRAMS for a talk and a short experimentation.

 

Demonstration of portable EMG system
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Demonstration of portable EMG system

Posted by: on Feb 28, 2019 | No Comments

Representatives from DELSYS will be at BRAMS to make a demonstration of one of their portable EMG systems (Trigno™ Wireless System).

BRAMS reading group
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BRAMS reading group

Posted by: on Feb 27, 2019 | No Comments

The BRAMS “Music and Movement” reading group will be at the conference room at BRAMS. The article for the meeting is: “Double Dissociation of Single-interval and Rhythmic Temporal Prediction in Cerebellar Degeneration and Parkinson’s Disease”.

Breska_Ivry_2018_Double_Dissociation_PD[2054] (1)

Ming Ruo Zhang & Hugo Laflamme

Participate in a study on RHYTHM

Posted by: on Feb 18, 2019 | No Comments

The laboratory of Prof. Simone Dalla Bella, University of Montreal, is interested in your abilities to perceive and synchronize to the rhythm.

  • We are looking for non-musicians (formal musical experience of less than two years), having  normal hearing and normal sight (or corrected to normal);
  • Receive $ 10 per hour by participating in three sessions of 1 hour and 30 minutes each;
  • In several tasks, you will have to either listen to sequences of sounds and detect if these sounds are at the same pace or synchronize by tapping on a tablet;
  • Appointments at your convenience!
  • International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS) is located at University of Montreal, Metro station Édouard-Montpetit

If you meet the following criteria :

  • 18 years old or more
  • Non-musician (less than two years of formal musical training)
  • Normal hearing and vision ( or corrected to normal)

Please write to  recrutement.dallabella@gmail.com  or contact us on 514-343-6111, poste 3594 if you have any questions or if you want to take an appointment.