Simona Maria Brambati, PhD

Simona Maria Brambati, PhD

Posted by: on Jul 11, 2019 | No Comments

Dr. Brambati has a PhD in Molecular Medicine (cognitive neuropsychology profile) from the Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele in Milan, Italy (2006). She then completed post-doctoral studies at the Memory and Aging Center (University of California, San Francisco) (2006-2007), and the IUGM research centre. Today she is a researcher at the IUGM research centre (FRQ-S Junior 1) and a professor under grant at the Department of Psychology, University of Montreal.

Dr. Simona Brambati

Samuel A. Mehr, PhD

Samuel A. Mehr, PhD

Posted by: on Jul 11, 2019 | No Comments

Samuel Mehr is a Research Associate in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University, where he directs the Music Lab. Sam studies music: how the design of the human mind leads us to perceive, create, and engage with music, and how this psychology of music may be leveraged to improve health outcomes in infancy and adulthood. These questions are multidisciplinary, drawing insights from the cognitive sciences, evolutionary biology, anthropology, ethnomusicology and music theory, linguistics, and computer science. Originally a musician, Sam earned a B.M. in Music Education from the Eastman School of Music before diving into science at Harvard, where he earned an Ed.D. in Human Development and Education under the mentorship of Howard Gardner, Elizabeth Spelke, and Steven Pinker

http://s.mehr.cz/

 

Mathieu Roy, PhD

Mathieu Roy, PhD

Posted by: on Jun 7, 2019 | No Comments

We currently have a good understanding of the mechanisms by which noxious stimuli are encoded in the periphery and transmitted to the brain, but little is known about how those nociceptive signals ultimately cause our subjective experience of pain: the age-old mind-body problem! However, for pain this is more than a just philosophical question since an increased understanding of the cerebral mechanisms giving rise to pain could have important implications for treatment. Why do certain people seem to suffer from excruciating pain in the absence of injury? How can certain people tolerate severe pain without taking any pain killers? While certain brain structures may be, perhaps, necessary for experiencing pain, it seems that no single structure is at the same time both necessary and sufficient for pain. Rather, pain seems to emerge from large-scale interactions between several brain regions – the hallmark of consciousness.

My lab and I are tackling these important questions using a variety of brain imaging (MRI, EGG, MEG) and psychological/psychophysiological methods (pain ratings, response times, decision-making, nociceptive flexion reflexes, skin conductance responses, facial EMG, heart rate, cortisol, etc.). Our research projects also span across a more clinically-oriented axis and a more fundamental research axis. Projects with patients with chronic pain investigate topics such as the role of the central nervous system in the effects of physical exercise training on pain, brain predictors of the transition from acute to chronic pain, as well as brain markers of chronic pain and their potential relationships with other genetic and epigenetic markers of chronic pain. Projects in cognitive neuroscience investigate phenomena such as the interactions between pain and cognition, pain and emotions, the effects of music on pain, how we learn to predict and avoid pain, and how we take decisions between and competing rewards.

The effect of music on pain is a topic that has fascinated me since my Ph.D. at UdeM with Isabelle Peretz and Pierre Rainville. We published one of the first experimental studies on the effects of pleasant and unpleasant music on pain (Roy et al., 2008), and I am now starting to renew with this cherished topic. Current and future projects will include manipulations of music-induced analgesia with pharmacological or cognitive-motivational interventions in order to understand the mechanisms mediating the effects of music on pain. We hope that an increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying music-induced analgesia will help improve its efficacy, and favor its adoption in medical settings to the benefit of patients undergoing painful medical procedures or suffering from chronic pain.

Simone Falk, PhD

Simone Falk, PhD

Posted by: on Mar 19, 2019 | No Comments

My research focuses on the interface between language and music. I am particularly interested in rhythmic phenomena in music and speech and rhythmic functions in communication, language acquisition and speech and language pathology. My approach is fundamentally interdisciplinary inspired by theory and methods of several disciplines (experimental linguistics, neurosciences (EEG), cognitive sciences, movement sciences).

The major aim of my current research program is to examine the role of rhythmic and temporal predictions in language processing in order to

  1. characterize developmental speech and language deficits and  better understand individual differences
  2. unravel the role of temporal predictions in discourse comprehension, verbal and motor coordination between interlocutors
  3. collaborate with speech therapists to develop new approaches for speech pathology intervention based on musical training, singing and rhythm interaction
Sonja A. Kotz, Ph.D

Sonja A. Kotz, Ph.D

Posted by: on Nov 29, 2017 | No Comments

Sonja A. Kotz is a cognitive, affective and translational neuroscientist who investigates the role of prediction in multimodal domains (perception, action, communication, music) in healthy and clinical populations using behavioural and modern neuroimaging techniques (E/MEG, s/fMRI). She holds a Chair in Translational Cognitive Neuroscience at Maastricht University, multiple honorary positions and professorships (Manchester & Glasgow, UK), Leipzig (Germany), (Georgetown, USA) and is currently the President of the European Society for Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience.

 

The research conducted in her research teams over the last 20 years has been devoted to three core topics: the domain specificity and/or domain generality of music, speech, and prosody, the impact of music on learning, and the impact of music in the rehabilitation of movement and speech/language disorders.

 

Maastricht University / P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands

François Prévost, PhD

François Prévost, PhD

Posted by: on Sep 20, 2016 | No Comments

Dr. Prévost completed a PhD in neuropsychology at Université de Montréal and a clinical degree in audiology at University of Ottawa. His research focuses on the neurophysiological correlates of speech-in-noise perception. He also investigates the brain plasticity and listening effort in hearing aid, bone-anchored hearing implant and cochlear implant users. Research tools include cortical evoked potentials, auditory brainstem responses, intra-cranial recordings and pupillometry. Sites of clinical practice are the McGill University Health Centre and ODYO Hearing Care, with growing expertise in clinical electrophysiology, hearing aids, implantable hearing devices and tinnitus management. After having taught clinical audiology abroad, now is a lecturer at the École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie de l’Université de Montréal.

 

Alexander Thiel, PhD

Alexander Thiel, PhD

Posted by: on Mar 2, 2016 | No Comments

Dr. Thiel is a neurologist and neuroscientist, who does translational research in post-stroke recovery using brain imaging and non-invasive brain stimulation methods. His neuroplasticity research program was established around the stroke unit at the Jewish General Hospital. This combination of an acute stroke unit with a non-invasive brain stimulation and imaging laboratory is the first of its kind in Canada, constituting a research facility at the patient’s bedside. It was awarded the HSFQ Stroke Excellence Award. This clinical research environment was further strengthened in January 2016 through the creation of a clinical trial platform on the new integrated neuroscience unit at the Jewish General Hospital that facilitates the systematic evaluation of different stimulation modalities and imaging methods in a clinical context.

His research program follows three major strands: 

(i) the translational program for in vivo molecular imaging of post-stroke recovery with MRI and PET studies processes like neruoinflammation as well neurodegeneration and regeneration in patients in vivo: 

(ii) the clinical program for non-invasive brain-stimulation as adjuvant therapy in early post-stroke rehabilitation; and 

(iii) the brain connectivity program which aims to determine whether network specific inter-hemispheric connectivity can identify patients which will respond better to inhibitory brain stimulation treatment or robot assisted training and may be useful in individualizing therapeutic brain stimulation. 

Dr. Thiel’s lab is cooperating with national and international researchers in the context of the international multicenter brain stimulation trial, for which Dr. Thiel’s lab is the lead study center. On a national level his lab collaborates with Drs. Haschinski, Cechetto and Whithead (University of Western Onatrio) on brain imaging of post-stroke cognitive recovery, in addition to the ongoing fruitful collaboration with Dr. Schirrmacher (University of Alberta), and Dr. Pike from the University of Calgary. 

Rushen Shi, PhD

Rushen Shi, PhD

Posted by: on Jul 17, 2015 | No Comments

Dr. Rushen Shi’s research group focuses on fundamental questions in child language. Their research questions include how infants and young children acquire their linguistic representations, such as the development of phonetic categories, early word recognition, the learning of meaning, and initial acquisition of morpho-syntactic structures. They attempt to understand the mechanisms underlying language acquisition and the interaction between the input and the grammar.

 

Link to laboratory: http://www.gr.uqam.ca

Bruno Gauthier, PhD

Bruno Gauthier, PhD

Posted by: on Jul 15, 2015 | No Comments

Bruno Gauthier est professeur adjoint au département de psychologie de l’Université de Montréal. Il s’intéresse à l’acquisition du langage et au développement de la perception et de la production de la parole chez l’enfant.

Son programme de recherche vise à mieux comprendre le développement neuropsychologique normal et atypique chez l’enfant et l’adolescent. Il vise plus précisément à :

  • développer et valider des méthodes d’évaluation et d’intervention auprès d’enfants qui présentent des troubles neurodéveloppementaux, incluant les troubles de l’attention, les troubles d’apprentissage (dyslexie, dyscalculie) et le syndrome de Tourette;
  • développer et valider des méthodes d’analyse et d’interprétation de données neuropsychologiques, et
  • modéliser les processus cognitifs par le biais de réseaux de neurones artificiels.
Ingrid Verduyckt, PhD

Ingrid Verduyckt, PhD

Posted by: on Jun 16, 2015 | No Comments

Dr. Ingrid Verduyckt is an Assistant Professor at the School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology at l’Université de Montréal. She has a Master’s degree in Speech Language Pathology from Lund’s University, Sweden, and a PhD in Psychology and Education from the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. Her research interests include the pathological mechanisms involved in benign voice disorders. In terms of production, she is interested in the effect of emotions on vocal motor control, and in the link between vocal behavior and speaker personality. On the perceptual level, she is interested in the impact of voice deterioration on the social image conveyed by the speaker.