BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Eldad Tsabary
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Eldad Tsabary

Publié par: le 20 novembre 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Sound-focused aural training with Inner Ear 

Abstract: Inner Ear is a SSHRC-funded multi-university research-creation project for developing an accessible, adaptive ear training tool geared toward musicians and audio engineers working in the various sound fields. The design of this software builds on a decade-long, ongoing, action research study with music students who major in electroacoustic studies. The objective of the research has been to understand the student’s aural skill acquisition process and subsequently develop comprehensive tools to facilitate rapid refinement of skills which are crucial to all sound-focused art. This tool provides users with quick, interactive feedback and engages their critical thinking regarding the skill acquisition process. Students who practiced their sonic hearing with Inner Ear at Concordia University report radical changes to their everyday hearing experience and a growing “fascination with small sounds occurring in all situations.” Students often also report some annoyance with their heightened aural awareness and their lost ability to ignore unpleasant sound in their environment (however, all note that the positive transformation outweighs the negative effects). In this lecture I will engage the audience with Inner Ear’s training modules; describe the functional and research contexts that lead to its creation; and cover the basic principles behind its design, transformational strength, and relevance to sound practices and our daily hearing.

Short bio: Dr. Eldad Tsabary is the coordinator of electroacoustic studies at Concordia University’s Department of Music. In the past decade, Eldad has spearheaded research and development of a sound-focused aural training method for electroacoustic musicians, which is informed by perception studies and is built on a transformational, democratic educational model. He is founder and director of Concordia Laptop Orchestra (CLOrk) which specializes in collective improvisation and interdisciplinary collaborative performances in which students function as co-creators/co-researchers. Notable CLOrk performances include a collaboration with pop star Ariane Moffat at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (MAC) and a performance in Akousma festival at Usine C. Eldad received his doctorate in music education from Boston University. Previously, Eldad has been president of the Canadian Electroacoustic Community (CEC) 2013-2019 and coordinator (2018-2019) of the Faculty of Fine Arts’ Interdisciplinary Studies area. Tsabary’s main areas of expertise are in the domain of sound studies: specifically (a) sonic aural training and (b) live electroacoustic performance. Through these areas of inquiry, Tsabary has been developing educational approaches, tools, and strategies to better-understand and transform the diverse internal processes involved in sound perception, organization, and creation—both individually and collectively within an ensemble. Through cyclical, ground-up, collaborative research projects, Tsabary has been seeking ways to adapt the educational environment to emerging contexts, goals, and ways of knowing and learning among individuals (of various cultural and neurodiverse backgrounds). Eldad is also deeply engaged in EDI activism; through chairing a Decolonization in the Arts and Humanities conference in Southeast Asia; through involvement in curricular design of a new Major in Sexuality Studies at Concordia’s Simone de Beauvoir Institute; and through collaborative intersectional activism in Concordia’s Electroacoustic Studies area.

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Dr. Frank Russo
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Dr. Frank Russo

Publié par: le 6 novembre 2019 | Pas de commentaire

SingWell Canada: Understanding group singing in older adults from a biopsychosocial perspective

Abstract: Many older adults face formidable challenges to social wellbeing. Foremost among these is the social isolation and loneliness that may arise from a combination of factors inclusive of retirement from work, increased physical distance from family, and the death of loved ones. Another prominent challenge to social wellbeing concerns stigma, often involving self-stereotyping whereby an individual internalizes commonly held negative characterizations of aging or aging-associated diseases as part of their social identity. SingWell Canada (https://www.singwell.ca) is a SSHRC-funded partnership development grant that aims to investigate the potential for choir singing to support social wellbeing in older adults living with age-associated diseases (Parkinson’s, Lung Disease, Dementia, Aphasia, Hearing Loss) as well as those who are in good health. We are currently tracking 15 newly formed choirs across Canada. A second aim of this project is to clarify the sociobiological underpinnings of any benefits to social wellbeing. Our results at the year-1 mark of this program of research suggest that group singing leads to increased social connectedness and reduced stigma. Pre-post session effects typically show increases in oxytocin and pain thresholds, and decreases in cortisol. Comparisons with control conditions suggest that some of these pre-post effects are driven by singing alone, while others arise as a function of group dynamics.

Short bio: Frank Russo is a professor of Psychology at Ryerson University, where he holds the Hear the World Research Chair in Music and Emotional Speech. He also holds status appointments in Rehabilitation Science and Music at the University of Toronto, and as an affiliate scientist at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. In his Science of Music Auditory Research and Technology (SMART) Lab at Ryerson, he studies the biological, cognitive, and social-emotional bases of music and speech. He also engages in two related areas of applied research. The first area seeks to understand perception of listening effort, music, and speech emotion in hearing impaired older adults. The second area assesses the potential for music-based interventions (especially singing) to contribute to health, communication and wellbeing. He is committed to the dissemination and translation of research beyond the academy through creative collaborations with community-based groups and industry. Successful translations of his research include a Canadian train-horn standard, a sensory substitution technology, new algorithms to support music perception through hearing aids, and the development of singing interventions to support communication deficits. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association and Massey College, and is a past president of the Canadian Acoustical Association.

 

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Dr. Bill Thompson
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Dr. Bill Thompson

Publié par: le 9 octobre 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Music and intercultural understanding

Abstract: Music is a powerful stimulus for wellbeing and interpersonal connection and is increasingly applied to promote intercultural understanding.  Yet there is little understanding of the social and psychological processes by which music has such effects. The aim of this talk is to consider the psychosocial impact and psychological underpinnings of music when used to address the challenges of people who are marginalised or stigmatised, and to promote social cohesion and intercultural understanding in multicultural societies. A framework is presented that considers the active ingredients and underlying mechanisms of music that confer physical, psychological and cultural benefits across segments of society.

Short bio: William Forde (Bill) Thompson is a Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, where he is Director of the Music Sound and Performance lab. His research and publications concern the connections between music and cognition, emotion, ageing, and intercultural understanding. He is author of the book « Music, Thought and Feeling: Understanding the Psychology of Music” (2014, 2nd edition, OUP), Editor of the Sage Encyclopedia of Music in the Social and Behavioral Sciences (2014) and Editor (with Kirk Olsen) of The Science and Psychology of Music (2020, ABC-Clio). Over his career, he has been elected as President of three societies in his field: the Australian Music Psychology Society, the Society for Music Perception and Cognition, and the Asia-Pacific Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music. In 2015 he was made a Fellow of the North American Association for Psychological Science. He is currently working at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, on music and intercultural understanding.

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Student Presentation by Kevin Jamey
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Student Presentation by Kevin Jamey

Publié par: le 25 septembre 2019 | Pas de commentaire

The effect of rhythm-based training on cognitive abilities in children with autism spectrum disorder

Abstract: Skill transfer effect presents an opportunity to increase learning potential in child development, as well as to target impaired abilities in pathological disorders. The long-term training of music engages a considerable set of skills, which can result in a generalization of ability outside the context of music. However, evidence for skill transfer effects from music training programs to cognitive abilities is inconsistent and may arise from the lack of longitudinal randomized-control trials as well as the breadth of different aspects involved in practicing music (pitch and rhythm, reading musical notation, and coordination with fellow musicians). Rhythm, a fundamental component of music, engages a large group of key cortical and subcortical processes and may provide a compelling and more narrowly defined entry point to study skill transfer effects mechanisms when trained through music. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is an ideal model population for testing the theoretical and clinical impact of a rhythm-based training such as beat-synchronization, which seems to have unique neural overlap with deficient processes in ASD (sensorimotor, cognitive, verbal and socioemotional processing) and to generate skill transfer for executive function in typical development. Given the discomfort that social interactions may engender in ASD and that individuals with ASD have generally intact musical perception as well as a common interest in music, the use of mobile technologies combined with music may help with compliance to interventions in ASD. In order to better understand the mechanisms at play in skill transfer to cognitive abilities in music, as well as how they might help remediate pathological disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), my PhD project will 1) quantitatively assess current evidence for transfer effects from music training using meta-analysis, 2) develop and validate a specific rhythm-based training (tablet application) aimed at improving a range of cognitive abilities in children with ASD 3) evaluate the potential of this rhythm-based training to address impairments in children with ASD in a longitudinal study, and 4) examine the neural basis of this rhythm training. This work will serve to better understand the contribution of rhythm, a fundamental component of music, in skill transfers attributed to music (for instance to cognitive abilities). This research will help in assessing the therapeutic potential of rhythm-based therapies for clinical populations, such as ASD. Finally, this work can help to guide future studies on the use of rhythm and new technologies in promoting cognitive improvement and compliance to training.

Short Bio:I am a PhD candidate at the University of Montreal, co-supervised by Dr. Simone Dalla Bella and Dr. Krista Hyde. I did my bachelor’s degree at McGill and my master’s with Dr. Krista Hyde at the University of Montreal. My special interests lie in music, neuropsychology and neurodevelopmental disorders. The focus of my graduate work is to better understand the mechanisms at play in skill transfer effects from music-based training to cognitive abilities, as well as how they might help remediate pathological disorders such as autism spectrum disorder.

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Student Presentation by Nicole Eichert
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Student Presentation by Nicole Eichert

Publié par: le 18 septembre 2019 | Pas de commentaire

What are the brain specializations underlying human vocal control?

Abstract: Human speech is a highly complex behavior that relies on evolutionary adaptations of the human brain. One of the suggested critical differences within the primate lineage is motor control of the larynx. We are investigating the cortical specialization underlying laryngeal motor control using functional neuroimaging and comparative neuroanatomy.

Nouveau cette année : BRAMS  ̶  CRBLM Lecture Series

Nouveau cette année : BRAMS ̶ CRBLM Lecture Series

Publié par: le 17 septembre 2019 | Pas de commentaire

En continuation de la mission du BRAMS d’être un terreau fertile pour un partage de connaissances scientifiques et un endroit favorable à la recherche et aux échanges pour les étudiants, une nouvelle série d’évènements aura lieu tous les mercredis à 15h au local D-427 (sauf exception).

Participez à une étude sur le RYTHME

Publié par: le 18 juillet 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Le laboratoire du Prof. Simone Dalla Bella de l’Université de Montréal, s’intéresse à vos capacités à percevoir et à vous synchroniser au rythme.

  • Nous cherchons des non-musiciens (expérience musicale formelle de moins de deux ans), ayant une audition et une vue normale (ou corrigée à la normale);
  • Recevez 10$ de l’heure en participant à trois sessions d’environ 1heure et 30 minutes chacune sur le rythme;
  • Dans plusieurs tâches, vous devrez soit écouter des séquences de sons et détecter si ces sons sont au même rythme ou vous synchroniser à ces sons en tapant sur une tablette;
  • Rendez-vous selon vos disponibilités!
  • Laboratoire International de recherche sur le cerveau, la musique et le son (BRAMS), situé à l’Université de Montréal, Station de Métro Édouard-Montpetit.

Si vous correspondez aux critères suivants :

  • Âgé de 18 ans et plus
  • Non-musicien ( expérience musicale formelle de moins de deux ans )
  • Audition et vue normales ( ou corrigées à la normale)

SVP écrivez-nous à recrutement.dallabella@gmail.com ou contactez-nous par téléphone au 514-343-6111, poste 3594 si vous avez des questions ou souhaitez planifier un rendez-vous.

BRAMS – Talk by Delphine Dellacherie

BRAMS – Talk by Delphine Dellacherie

Publié par: le 18 juillet 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Let’s dance: cerebellum and rhythm in children with developmental anomalies

Abstract: The cerebellum plays an important role in music perception and temporal cognition, including sensorimotor synchronization, critical for motor and cognitive development. Moreover, sensorimotor learning, which is critical in a child’s development, depends on the cerebellum.

Offre emploi: agent de recherche au BRAMS (poste à temps plein)

Publié par: le 18 juillet 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Le laboratoire international de recherche sur le cerveau, la musique et le son (BRAMS) recherche un agent de recherche (poste à temps plein) pour entretenir et développer la plate-forme technologique du laboratoire.

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Presentation by Dr. Joseph DeSouza
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Presentation by Dr. Joseph DeSouza

Publié par: le 26 juin 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Paradigm shift: eye movements vs. attention ||  music vs dance = best neurorehabilitation for Parkinson’s!

 

Short bio: Dr. Joseph DeSouza is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology & Graduate programs in Biology, Interdisciplinary Studies and Neuroscience Graduate Diploma Program at York University’s Centre for Vision Research. He received his PhD in Neuroscience at the University of Western Ontario in 2001, which was followed by postdoctoral training at the Robarts Research Institute and the Centre for Vision Research. Since 2006, his lab (www.joeLAB.com) focuses on how multisensory signals are attended and/or suppressed depending on the appropriate behavioural context and how the next decision is chosen through improvised or trained motor movements (eye, hand, body and/or dance). His lab’s translational research with people with Parkinson’s Disease, people with depression and chronic pain and Problem Gamblers aims to show how and where in brain networks change as a function of neurorehabilitation.  His lifelong pursuit will be to ease the burden of disease and to find neuroimaging biomarkers through computational modelling.