Marc Schönwiesner, PhD

Marc Schönwiesner, PhD

Publié par: le 9 février 2012 | Pas de commentaire

I am an Associate Professor at the BRAMS labs and the Psychology Department of the University of Montreal. I study basic mechanisms of sound analysis in the human brain with functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, and psychoacoustic tests.

List of publications at PubMed  »

Virginia Penhune, PhD

Virginia Penhune, PhD

Publié par: le 9 février 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Ma recherche porte sur ​​la compréhension des changements plastiques dans le cerveau humain liés à l’apprentissage moteur et l’expertise. Une ligne de recherche utilise l’IRM structurelle et fonctionnelle pour examiner le rôle des réseaux moteurs dans l’apprentissage et la mémoire pour la motricité fine. Nous sommes particulièrement intéressés à identifier les régions du cerveau impliquées dans l’apprentissage de différents paramètres de mouvement, de l’intégration auditive-motrice et le sens du rythme, et la contribution des différences individuelles dans la structure du cerveau et la capacité d’apprendre de nouvelles compétences. La deuxième ligne de travail comprend les études de traitement du rythme musical et les études chez les personnes ayant une formation musicale. Surtout, cette ligne de recherche comprend l’enquête sur l’interaction du développement et de l’expérience à travers l’étude de l’impact de la formation musicale à des âges différents.

Caroline Palmer, PhD

Caroline Palmer, PhD

Publié par: le 9 février 2012 | Pas de commentaire

My research program combines two related issues in cognitive psychology: how people remember long sequences typical of speech and music, and how they produce those sequences. Many theories of memory for speech, written language, pictures, and other human endeavors focus on the problem of serial order: knowing what comes next in a sequence. What most theories do not address is the time course of retrieval: when particular sequential information is available, and for how long. My research focuses on the time course of serial order in music performance, one of the most complex of human skills. Not only must item information be recalled correctly in music, but temporal information (when and for how long events should occur) must also be recalled correctly. My work has established that performers’ memory for musical sequences can be extremely accurate (smaller than 3% error rate), despite the complexity, length, and temporal requirements of music (seeFinney & Palmer, 2003).

One theme of my research addresses the range or scope of planning in sequence production; the range of planning, similar to memory span measures that gauge short-term memory capacity, refers to the span of sequence items that are accessible at a given time during performance (see Palmer, 2005). We have developed a formal theoretical framework for serial recall in music performance that makes time-dependent predictions of the range of planning during production (see Palmer & Pfordresher, 2003), as well as an account of the relationship between speed and accuracy (see Pfordresher, Palmer, & Jungers, 2007). We also address how the scope of planning changes during different stages of skill acquisition (see Palmer & Drake, 1997). Child pianists’ performances indicated skilled-related increases in monitoring one’s own behavior, in anticipating upcoming events, and in generalizing beyond specific motor movements. Comparisons with adult performers indicated these cognitive capacities change most during the first 5 years of skill acquisition, whereas domain-specific knowledge increases across all stages of skill acquisition (see Palmer & Meyer, 2000).

A second theme addresses the motor actions that underlie skilled performance, and properties of goal-directed movement that are specific to individuals. Using motion capture techniques, we record pianists’ finger movements. Dynamic (time-dependent) properties of motion specific to individuals and fingers inform about how personal identity may be rooted in voluntary, goal-directed actions (see Dalla Bella & Palmer, 2006). Motion during sequence production also relects the biomechanical constraints that arise from musicians’ finger and hand movements as they tap on a table (see Loehr & Palmer, 2007), or perform on an instrument (see Palmer, Carter, Koopmans & Loehr, 2007).

A third theme of our research extends our memory findings to understanding how people perceive stable, categorical events in a continuously changing world. Listeners tend to perceive musical sequences as temporally regular; people without any musical training can clap along to continuously fluctuating music with little effort. An ability to perceive temporal regularity is remarkable, given our findings that actual music performances are temporally irregular. We model with dynamical systems approaches how listeners are informed by the temporal fluctuations in music performance, by capitalizing on the systematic nature of the variability (see Large & Palmer, 2002). We have also shown that synchronization of tapping with music is aided by listeners’ sensitivity to phase differences in the onsets of produced and perceived beats (see Loehr, Palmer & Large, 2007). This work indicates that temporal structure is fundamental to understanding how people perceive meaningful units in a continuously varying auditory world, and it offers a primary resource for aiding people’s memory for and learning of auditory sequences

Pierre Jolicoeur, PhD

Pierre Jolicoeur, PhD

Publié par: le 9 février 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Dr. Jolicoeur is a Full Professor at Université de Montréal (2002-present) where he holds the Canada Resarch Chair in Experimental Cognitive Science and leads an internationally-recognized research program in cognitive neuroscience based on noninvasive brain imaging techniques (EEG, MEG, and fMRI).  He completed a B.Sc. in Psychology at McGill University in 1977 and a Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology at Harvard University in 1982.  He was a faculty member at the University of Saskatchwan (1982-1984) and at the University of Waterloo (1984-2002). Dr. Jolicoeur was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2004 and he is the recipient of the D. O. Hebb Distinguished Contribution Award of the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour, and Cognitive Science for 2009.  He is the Associate Director of the Centre de Recherche en Neuropsychologie et Cognition and the the Director of the MEG Laboratory.

His research is funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Alzheimer Society of Canada, the Canadian Fund for Innovation, the Canada Research Chairs Program, the Fonds de recherche sur la nature et les technologies, and the Fonds de la recherche en santé Québec, and the Quebec Bio-Imaging Network.  His work at BRAMS focuses on auditory attention and auditory short-term memory for basic features of sound.

Krista Hyde, PhD

Krista Hyde, PhD

Publié par: le 9 février 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Dr Krista Hyde’s research aims at better understanding the behavioral and brain correlates of human complex sound processing (i.e. in music and speech) in both typical and atypical development.

Research themes:

  • Local and global auditory processing
  • Spectral and temporal processing
  • Cross-modal processing (i.e., auditory-motor, auditory-visual)
  • Brain plasticity / training studies
  • Brain connectivity studies

Populations studied (children and adults):

  • typical-development
  • specialized training (i.e. music and dance)
  • developmental disorders: autism spectrum disorders, dyslexia, tone-deafness

Methods used:

  • cognitive and psychophysical measures
  • structural (VBM, DTI, cortical thickness) and functional MRI measures
  • correlational analyses between brain and behavioral/ clinical measures

She is presently Assistant Professor at the Department of Psychology of the University of Montreal and Adjunct Professor at the Deptartment of Psychiatry, at McGill University.

Sylvie Hébert, PhD

Sylvie Hébert, PhD

Publié par: le 9 février 2012 | Pas de commentaire
Sylvie Hébert a obtenu son Doctorat en Psychologie expérimentale (Neuropsychologie) à l’Université de Montréal en 1996, et son postdoctorat à Queen’s University en 1998.
Intérêts de recherche:
  • perception auditive
  • musique
  • psychoacoustique
  • acouphènes
  • vieillissement
  • hyperacousie
Christine Beckett, PhD

Christine Beckett, PhD

Publié par: le 9 février 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Dr. Christine Beckett’s teaching at Concordia includes ear training, keyboard skills, theory (harmony, counterpoint, analysis, etc.), and surveys of music research. Dr. Beckett has taught within Concordia’s undergraduate curriculum for both Majors (Integrative Music Studies and Electroacoustic Studies); at the Faculty level in FFAR courses for non-Fine Arts students; and as a guest lecturer in graduate programs such as the Diploma in Advanced Music Performance Studies and the Certificate in Music Therapy. Previous to arriving at Concordia, Beckett taught at McGill where she was Chair of Musicianship 2001-2003, and at the Université de Sherbrooke, CEGEPs, Suzuki institutes, and in private studio. Besides teaching, Dr. Beckett enjoys organizing university events such as conferences, special concerts, the Welcome for first year students, and Concordia’s annual Open House.

Dr. Beckett studied music education, composition, and piano/viola performance at the University of Toronto. She then did viola performance and graduate studies in research on ear training at McGill. In 1993, she was the first person to graduate from McGill with a Ph.D. in Music. Dr. Beckett has performed as pianist and string player in various solo and ensemble contexts in North America and Europe.

Dr. Beckett’s research is in the exciting and rapidly-expanding field of music perception and cognition, with studies on: absolute pitch; music reading/dyslexia; issues in ear training; music and emotion; cross-arts studies such as creative strategies of musicians and dancers; oral heritages such as Irish traditional music; etc.

Dr. Beckett is a full charter Faculty member of the International Laboratory for Brain, Music, and Sound (BRAMS), and a member of the BRAMS Board of Directors.

Evan Balaban, PhD

Evan Balaban, PhD

Publié par: le 9 février 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Species behavioral differences that do not result from exposure to different environments are well-documented, yet little is known about the developmental and evolutionary changes in brains that are responsible for them. Such differences are thought to be due to species differences in « neural default settings » that cause species brains to organize their own development and incoming experiential information in divergent ways. These « predispositions » are important for understanding cognitive development because they provide the scaffolding upon which learning builds complex perceptions, emotions, evaluations and reactions. Our laboratory uses transplants of embryonic brain tissue between two bird species at early stages of development to learn more about the brain mechanisms underlying species behavioral differences. The resulting animals, called chimeras, provide an opportunity to survey the brain for particular regions that, when transplanted between species, will transform the performance of a particular target behavior by the host individuals to the form shown by donor individuals.

We concentrate on auditory communication behaviors, because they are cognitively and socially complex and biologically important. Using transplants in combination with neuroanatomical and electrophysiological techniques, and molecular and metabolic-based methods for imaging brain activity, we identify interacting cell groups in the developing nervous system that make decisive contributions to species differences in the architecture of neural circuits underlying communicative behaviors, and specify the role these regions play in neural and behavioral development. These studies also shed light on the particular developmental mechanisms evolution uses to change brains and behaviors.

A second line of research focuses on neural correlates of human auditory perception. We develop methods for studying changes in ongoing brain activity during the perception of naturalistic time-varying sound sequences such as speech or music, with a particular interest in applying these methods to study the neural mechanisms of pitch perception (prosodic perception in speech), auditory category formation (phonetic categories in speech), and how these mechanisms emerge ontogenetically.

Jorge L. Armony, PhD

Jorge L. Armony, PhD

Publié par: le 9 février 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Notre compréhension actuelle des troubles reliés au stress, y compris le trouble de stress post-traumatique (TSPT), les phobies, les crises de panique et l’anxiété généralisée, résulte de l’étude de la façon dont le cerveau traite la peur.

Jorge Armony, Ph.D., mène une recherche sur la façon dont le cerveau détecte dans l’environnement des stimuli qui peuvent signaler la présence de menaces ou de dangers et comment ce mécanisme interagit avec d’autres processus tels que la conscience, l’attention, et la mémoire.

Dans sa quête de réponses, Jorge Armony se sert de plusieurs techniques de recherche dernier cri dont l’imagerie par résonance magnétique fonctionnelle (IRMf), les mesures comportementales et physiologiques (i.e., conductivité de la peau et fréquence cardiaque), et également la modélisation informatique.

Ses contributions à la compréhension des troubles psychiatriques provenant d’un mauvais fonctionnement du système de la peur sont significatives. Ainsi, Jorge Armony a récemment révélé des liens comportementaux et anatomiques dans la modulation de l’attention spatiale par le biais des émotions en se servant d’un paradigme pour le conditionnement de la peur.

Ces percées mettent encore plus en évidence le rôle des amygdales dans le traitement de la peur et servent à profiler les rôles respectifs des cortex frontal, pariétal, orbito-frontal latéral dans l’attention spatiale.

En 2002, Jorge Armony s’est vu attribuer une chaire de recherche du Canada (niveau 2) en neurosciences affectives.

Robert J. Zatorre, PhD

Robert J. Zatorre, PhD

Publié par: le 9 février 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Dr. Zatorre, based at the Montreal Neurological Institute, works in cognitive neuroscience.  His research deals with complex auditory perceptual processes, especially the processing of musical sounds and speech. He also works on auditory spatial processes and cross-modal plasticity.  Additional research is concerned with anatomical measures of auditory cortex and its relation to hemispheric asymmetries.  Research methods include functional imaging techniques (fMRI, PET), cortical morphometry, and behavioral-lesion methods in patients with focal brain damage.