Mickael Begon, Ph.D.

Mickael Begon, Ph.D.

Publié par: le 29 novembre 2017 | Pas de commentaire

Biomécanique, modélisation-simulation

Département de kinésiologie

Champs d’intérêt

  • Modélisation et simulation mécanique de la motricité humaine avec ou sans matériel;
  • Biomécanique de l’épaule de la prévention à la réadaptation;
  • Optimisation de mouvements sportifs.

Principaux projets de recherche en cours

  • Modélisation musculo-squelettique de l’épaule pour la conception d’orthèse et la prévention en manutention;
  • Modélisation de la cinématique des tissus mous et des os (application au membre inférieur);
  • Optimisation de mouvements gymniques à la barre fixe;
  • Mesure de la cinématique tridimensionnelle sur grand champ (marche, kayak et aviron);
  • Conception d’ergomètres optimisés (kayak et aviron)

 

Annelies Bockstael, Ph.D.

Annelies Bockstael, Ph.D.

Publié par: le 6 juillet 2017 | Pas de commentaire

Main interest is interdisciplinary research on auditory processing, attention and cognition.

In 2010, I obtained my PhD in Social Health Sciences at Ghent University (Belgium) on improved methods for the verification and implementation of personal hearing protectors at the work floor. This work was a highly interdisciplinary project, supervised by the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, and the Acoustics Research group (Department of Information and Communication Technology). From 2010 to 2016, I joined the Acoustics group as postdoctoral fellow of the Flemish Research Foundation (FWO). There I have been working on instantaneous effect of sound on human hearing and functioning.

My main research interest is how noise exposure affects in real-life health, functioning and well-being. I study this in four different domains: noise-induced hearing loss, environmental noise exposure, the effect of noise on cognition and attention, and particular subgroups who are particularly sensitive to sound and noise, including people with neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. This includes the assessment of various physiological measurement techniques, such as oto-acoustic emissions (OAE, assessing inner ear functioning) and electro-encephalography (EEG).

I am currently co-supervising one PhD student working on loudness perception and auditory processing in Parkinson’s disease, and another PhD project that will start shortly on single-trial EEG to assess attention fluctuation in auditory processing.

I consider myself an active member of the scientific community with over 30 scientific journal publications, and more than 25 contributions to conferences. I have received from Ghent University the Helmont price of Logopaedic and Audiological Sciences in 2013, the Young scientist award (InterNoise 2013) and the best students paper award at Euronoise 2009. I am also member of the CEN standards’ working group, am peer-reviewer of various journals in the broad field of acoustics, and have been session chair at two conferences.

Together with my scientific work, I am an enthusiastic teacher of various courses in audiology and acoustics, and supervise yearly several master projects, in audiology as well as engineering.

Karim Jerbi, PhD

Karim Jerbi, PhD

Publié par: le 28 septembre 2015 | Pas de commentaire

Dr. Jerbi is an assistant professor at Université de Montréal (2014-present) where he holds the Canada Research Chair in Systems Neuroscience and Cognitive Neuroimaging (Junior CRC). He leads a interdisciplinary research program that explores the neural substrate of brain function and dysfunction through the application of advanced signal processing and machine learning methods to multi-modal and multi-scale brain data.

He holds a PhD in Cognitive Neuroscience and Brain Imaging (awarded by the University of Paris VI, France) and a degree in Biomedical Engineering (awarded by the University of Karlsruhe, Germany). In December 2012, he completed a Research Director Habilitation (awarded by the Claude Bernard University, UCBL, Lyon I).

Research overview: The focus of Dr. Jerbi’s research is the study of the functional role of neural oscillations and brain-wide network dynamics in human cognitive processes (e.g. perception, intention, action, error and performance monitoring and resting states) and their breakdown in psychiatric disorders. To achieve this, the research conducted in his lab relies on a combination of invasive (intracranial EEG, LFPs, single and multi-unit recordings) and non-invasive (EEG and MEG) recordings. Because his research is rooted in systems neuroscience and neuroimaging, his research and collaboration cover a wide range of cognitive processes, which include among other topics, audition, language, speech and music processing.

Research keywords: neuroscience, neuroimaging, brain networks, connectivity, oscillations, artificial intelligence, brain-computer interfaces, cognition, neurological and psychiatric disorders.

Musical preferences: Chinese man, Sonic Youth, DJ Rupture, John Cage, Aphex Twin, Fela Kuti, The Cure, Gnawa Diffusion…

Denise Klein, PhD

Denise Klein, PhD

Publié par: le 25 août 2015 | Pas de commentaire

Dr. Denise Klein is a Scientist in the Cognitive Neuroscience Unit at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery and Director of the Centre for Research on Brain Language and Music at McGill University, Montreal. She obtained her Ph.D. at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. Dr. Klein’s thesis research focused on developmental reading problems in bilingual children. Dr. Klein came to the MNI in 1992 as a postdoctoral fellow to work with Dr. Brenda Milner.  Dr. Klein’s arrival at the MNI coincided with the emerging use of functional neuroimaging techniques to study the neural representation of language. Dr. Klein has played a leading role in the development of the MNI’s cognitive neuroscience research program using positron emission tomography (PET) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and more recently, functional MRI, to measure regional changes in cerebral blood flow during the performance of various language tasks. Dr. Klein’s early work pioneered the use of brain imaging for the study of bilingualism. Her research has provided a springboard for current debates about bilingual brain organization. Her findings also have implications for educational policy and for shedding light on optimal periods for early language exposure and learning in child development.

 

About the Language experience and the brain laboratory

Denise Klein, Ph.D., Principal Investigator

Language experience and the brain laboratory at the Montreal Neurological Institute

The main focus in the lab is to explore how our early experience with language impacts the human brain, higher cognitive functions, and learning?  Our research combines behavioral methods with neuroimaging to investigate how neural recruitment is influenced by the age of acquisition/exposure, proficiency in the language, and the distinctive characteristics of languages. We seek to enhance our understanding of critical-period phenomena and neural plasticity in the human brain. The program of research addresses the extent to which the human brain has the capacity to change as a result of learning. Here, we specifically investigate the extent to which the neural patterns are fixed and the extent to which the patterns can be altered later in life. The results of these studies reveal the neural underpinnings of human brain development in relation to the age of language exposure, and they suggest periods when learning language are most optimal in early life.

A second focus in the lab is to use our work based on basic science to develop tools and questions related to presurgical and pre-treatment brain mapping in patients with various neurological disorders. In our lab we use neuroimaging tools to help map out functionally important areas for cognition in patients with focal brain lesions who are about to undergo treatment procedures at the Montreal Neurological Hospital involving cortex bordering on important functional brain areas. Our lab is currently responsible for running a pre-treatment functional brain mapping program at the MNI that integrates anatomical MRI, functional MRI and PET to facilitate preoperative diagnostic procedures in patients with brain lesions such as tumours, epileptic foci and vascular malformations that are in close proximity to areas of the brain that are critical to movement, vision, sensation, or language.

Phaedra Royle, PhD

Phaedra Royle, PhD

Publié par: le 22 octobre 2013 | Pas de commentaire

Phaedra Royle détient un doctorat en Linguistique (UdeM) et un post doc en Sciences de la communication et ses troubles (McGill). Ses intérêts de recherche touchent à la psycholinguistique, la neurolinguistique, les troubles du langage (dysphasie), l’acquisition du langage, la morphologie et la morphosyntaxe. Ses études actuelle portent principalement sur ll’acquisition et le traitement du syntagme nominal et de l’accord en genre en français, la neuroimagerie avec potentiels évoqués des processus morphologiques et de l’accord, ainsi que le pistage oculaire du traitement en lecture de mots morphologiquement complexes.

Nathalie Gosselin, PhD, Neuropsychologue

Nathalie Gosselin, PhD, Neuropsychologue

Publié par: le 7 décembre 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Nathalie Gosselin, Ph.D., est Professeure adjointe au Département de Psychologie de l’Université de Montréal et Chercheure au Laboratoire international de recherche sur le cerveau, la musique et le son (BRAMS) et au CRBLM (Centre de recherche sur le cerveau, le langage et la musique). Elle s’intéresse principalement aux effet de la musique sur la cognition, l’humeur, la santé et le stress, tant chez les individus aux prises avec des troubles neuropsychologiques ou des problématique de santé mentale, que chez les personnes sans atteinte neurologique ni trouble psychiatrique. Ses études ayant pour but d’examiner les impacts de la musique de fond sur la cognition sont financés par les Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société culture (FQRSC Établissement de nouveaux chercheurs-professeurs). Les projets de Dre Gosselin visant à explorer l’effet de la musique sur le stress sont financés par le Conseil de recherche en sciences humaines (CRSH Développement Savoir). Enfin, ses recherches sur l’effet de la musique sur l’agitation post traumatique auprès de patients ayant subit un traumatisme craniocérébral sont financées par le Consortium pour le développement de la recherche en traumatologie (AERDPQ, AQESSS, FRQS, MSSS, REPAR, SAAQ).

 

Les travaux de Nathalie Gosselin avec des adultes cérébrolésés ont permis de mieux comprendre l’organisation du cerveau dans la reconnaissance des émotions musicales. Elle a notamment démontré le rôle clé de l’amygdale dans la perception de la peur évoquée par la musique. Elle étudie également le traitement émotionnel à travers les domaines, incluant la musique, la voix et les visages. Ses recherches postdoctorales ont d’ailleurs portées sur la perception des émotions évoquées par la musique, les visages et la voix auprès de patients ayant la démence de type Alzheimer.

 

Nathalie Gosselin est également Neuropsychologue. Elle a notamment été clinicienne à l’Hôpital Rivière-des-Prairies, un centre psychiatrique affilié à l’Université de Montréal, ou elle réalisait des évaluations neuropsychologiques auprès d’enfants et d’adultes présentant divers troubles de santé mentale (p. ex., trouble dans le spectre de l’autisme, trouble de l’humeur, trouble anxieux, trouble déficitaire de l’attention). Dans son travail, elle était amenée à contribuer au diagnostic différentiel et à formuler des recommandations pour orienter les interventions. Actuellement, elle est impliquée dans le programme D.Psy. en neuropsychologie clinique de l’Université de Montréal. Elle est notamment responsable de supervision de stages en neuropsychologie clinique. Elle offre également des services d’évaluation neuropsychologique au privé. Pour plus d’informations, consultez le site web suivant : http://www.musec.ca/

Alexandre Lehmann, PhD

Alexandre Lehmann, PhD

Publié par: le 6 septembre 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Alexandre Lehmann, M.Eng., Ph.D., est professeur adjoint à la Faculté de Médecine de l’Université McGill et professeur associé au Département de Psychologie de l’Université de Montréal. Il est également membre régulier du CRBLM (Centre for Research on Brain Language and Mind).

Ses recherches portent sur les neurosciences cognitives des processus auditifs chez l’humain. Il a effectué des travaux sur la plasticité cérébrale et l’intégration sensori-motrice, au niveaux cortical et sous-cortical. Il s’intéresse en particulier à l’attention sélective, la perception de la consonance, le couplage rythmique et l’étude de la conscience. Il applique actuellement ces approches à l’étude de la performance et de la réhabilitation chez les porteurs d’implants cochléaires.

Il cherche à comprendre comment l’interaction dynamique entre structures corticales et sous-corticales rend possible la cognition et la conscience, en ligne avec des approches oscillatoires telles que proposées par le cadre théorique de l’enaction. À terme, il souhaite combiner les récentes avancées théoriques et technologiques, telles que la neuro-phénoménologie, le “cerveau à cerveau” et l’imagerie cérébrale embarquée, afin d’étudier des situations de la vie réelle comme la danse, le chant ou les percussions en groupe.

François Champoux, PhD

François Champoux, PhD

Publié par: le 29 août 2012 | Pas de commentaire

François Champoux a obtenu une maîtrise en psychologie de l’Université de Montréal, une maîtrise de l’Université d’Ottawa en sciences de la santé (audiologie) et un doctorat en sciences biomédicales (audiologie) de l’Université de Montréal. Il a aussi effectué un post-doctorat en neurologie à l’Institut Neurologique de Montréal. Il est membre de l’Ordre des orthophonistes et audiologistes du Québec (OOAQ), de l’Association Canadienne des Orthophonistes et des Audiologistes (ACOA) et de l’Académie canadienne d’audiologie (ACA). François Champoux est actuellement professeur adjoint à la Faculté de médecine de l’Université de Montréal. Il dirige le Laboratoire de recherche en neurosciences auditives situé à l’École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie (ÉOA). Il est conjointement chercheur au Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en réadaptation du Montréal métropolitain (CRIR), au site de l’Institut Raymond-Dewar (IRD) et au Centre de recherche en neuropsychologie et cognition (CERNEC). En 2012, il a été nommé chercheur-boursier au Fonds de recherche en santé du Québec (FRSQ).

 

Marcelo Wanderley, PhD

Marcelo Wanderley, PhD

Publié par: le 9 février 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Marcelo M. Wanderley was born in Curitiba, Brazil, in 1965. He holds a B.Eng. degree in electrical engineering from the Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR), Curitiba, Brazil, an M.Eng. degree in integrated analog circuit design from the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianópolis, Brazil, and a Ph.D. degree from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie—Paris VI, Paris, France, on acoustics, signal processing, and computer science applied to music. His main research interests include gestural control of sound synthesis, input device design and evaluation, sensor design and data acquisition, and human–computer interaction. He has published several book chapters and papers in various areas related to new interfaces for musical expression and is the coeditor, with Prof. M. Battier, of the electronic publication Trends in Gestural Control of Music. In 2003 Dr. Wanderley was the Chair of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME03). In 2006, he co-authored (with Eduardo R. Miranda) the textbook “New Digital Musical Instruments: Control and Interaction Beyond the Keyboard”, A-R Editions, the first comprehensive reference on this area. He is currently Associate Professor in Music Technology at the Schulich School of Music, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada.

Sandra E. Trehub, PhD

Sandra E. Trehub, PhD

Publié par: le 9 février 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Mes recherches portent sur (a) la perception de la musique dans le développement normal des nourrissons, les enfants et les adultes et chez les auditeurs sourds avec des implants cochléaires (b) le chant de la mère et ses conséquences pour les auditeurs infantile, et (c) le développement du chant dans la petite enfance.