Pascale Lidji, PhD

Pascale Lidji, PhD

Publié par: le 3 octobre 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Pascale Lidji was a postdoctoral scholar in the Sequence Production Lab., McGill University, from 2009 to 2012, where she worked under the supervision of Prof. Caroline Palmer. She now works as a clinical neuro-psychologist.

Pascale Lidji owns joint PhD in psychology from Université Libre de Bruxelles and Université de Montreal. Her dissertation, supervised by Prof Régine Kolinksy and Prof. Isabelle Peretz, addressed the interactions between music and language in sung stimuli. In her postdoctoral project, conducted under the direction of Prof. Caroline Palmer in collaboration with Prof. Isabelle Peretz, she investigates the perceptual and motor processes involved in synchronization with speech and song. Using behavioral methods and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), she also explores the beneficial effects of choral speech and song on word production in aphasic patients.

Jessica Phillips-Silver, PhD

Jessica Phillips-Silver, PhD

Publié par: le 3 octobre 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Jessica Phillips-Silver was a postdoctoral fellow at BRAMS (Université de Montréal) from 2007 to 2011, working under the supervision of Prof. Isabelle Peretz. Jessica now lives in Washington DC, where she continues to work in close collaboration with Isabelle Peretz on rhythm perception and production.

Jessica Phillips-Silver received her Ph.D. in Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour at McMaster University, where she worked with Professor Laurel Trainor in the Auditory Development Lab. Jessica then pursued her postdoctoral training in music neuropsychology at BRAMS, at the University of Montreal, under the supervision of Professor Isabelle Peretz. Jessica is also a vocal performer and music educator, trained at Carnegie Mellon University, and currently collaborates on a Cuban jazz project in Montreal.

At BRAMS, Jessica is studying the basic musical ability of perceiving and synchronizing movement to the beat in music. Her research employs motion capture of body movement to evaluate the precision of people’s dance movement to real music, and perceptual judgment tasks to evaluate people’s ability to judge the precision of videos of a model dancing to music. Jessica documents these abilities in healthy adults and children, as well as in amusic populations. Jessica is also interested in music entrainment and synchronization individuals with cochlear implants.

Jamila Andoh, PhD

Jamila Andoh, PhD

Publié par: le 11 septembre 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Jamila Andoh était stagiaire postdoctorale au BRAMS (Institut Neurologique de Montréal, Université McGill) de 2009 à 2012, et travaillait sous la supervision du Pr. Robert Zatorre. Elle est maintenant associée de recherche au Clinical Research and Imaging Centre (CRICBristol), au Royaume Uni.

Jamila Andoh received the M.S. degree in Physics from the University of Montpellier (France) in 2003 and the Ph.D. degrees in Physics and medical Imaging in Orsay, Paris (France) in 2006. She also had a first post-doctoral experience in Nottingham (United Kingdom), where she associated Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) to investigate the neural connectivity in language-related areas. She is currently carrying out a second post-doctoral research in the Zlab at the Montreal Neurological Institute (McGill University) with Dr. Robert Zatorre. Her research combines functional MRI and TMS to investigate the functional organization of the auditory cortex. Jamila is especially interested in the functional reorganization occurring after a « virtual » brain lesion such as TMS and investigates the role of TMS to optimize therapeutic application in language-related disorders (autisme, tinnitus, auditory hallucinations in schizophrenic patients).

Sibylle Herholz, PhD

Sibylle Herholz, PhD

Publié par: le 11 septembre 2012 | Pas de commentaire

Sibylle Herholz était stagiaire postdoctorale au BRAMS (Institut Neurologique de Montréal, Université McGill) de 2009 à 2012, et travaillait sous la supervision du Prof. Robert Zatorre.

Sibylle Herholz received her diploma in psychology in 2006 from the University of Düsseldorf (Germany) with a thesis on false memories in recognition. In 2009 she received her Ph.D. (Dr. rerum naturalium) in psychology/ neuroscience from the University of Münster (Germany) under the supervision of Christo Pantev in the PhD program of the Otto Creutzfeldt Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience (OCC). For her dissertation she studied the effects of short- and long-term musical training on behavioral and neuronal correlates of auditory processing using MEG and behavioral techniques at the Institute for Biomagnetism and Biosignalanalysis (IBB) in Münster. In a two-year post-doctoral fellowship funded by the DFG (Germany’s largest research funding organization) she currently studies the effects of musical training on neuronal and behavioral correlates of auditory imagery with Robert Zatorre at the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI). She is also involved in a collaboration project with Andrea Halpern (Bucknell University) on memory and musical imagery, and in collaboration projects with colleagues of University of Münster on expertise effects on music and language processing and on short-term musical training in stroke recovery. Since 2012, she is working at the German Research Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn, Germany.