Nicolò Francesco Bernardi

Nicolò Francesco Bernardi

Posted by: on Dec 10, 2015 | No Comments

I am interested in the spontaneous music behaviors of individuals without musical training, singing and dancing in particular. Why do we move to music? Why do we voice our exhalation with patterned sounds? One line of research investigates spontaneous movements to music, how do they modulate music-evoked emotions, and how do they relate to emotional awareness and personality traits. Another line of research investigates the psychological and neurophysiological effects of spontaneous vocal productions. My postdoctoral research is conducted at BRAMS, in the laboratory of Prof. Isabelle Peretz. In my research I use psychophysical methods, motion capture, cardiovascular and respiratory measures and fMRI.

Co-supervised by Dr Isabelle Peretz (UdeM – BRAMS) & Dr David J. Ostry (McGill), from September 1st, 2015  until August 31st, 2016

 

Yi Du, PhD

Yi Du, PhD

Posted by: on May 25, 2015 | No Comments

My research uses a combination of different neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, MEG and EEG) to investigate the cognitive and neural basis of human speech comprehension, with special emphasis on interaction between auditory “what”, “where” and “how” neural pathways that engages in encoding sound identity, spatial location, and sensorimotor integration, respectively. I am also interested in the brain plasticity associated with aging and musical training experience when processing speech stimuli. My current project at McGill University and BRAMS focuses on the brain mechanisms underlying musicians’ expertise in speech perception by testing the hypothesis that strengthened auditory-motor integration function related with musical training can be transferred and benefit speech perception, especially in noisy environments.

Marianne Anke Stephan, PhD

Marianne Anke Stephan, PhD

Posted by: on Nov 10, 2014 | No Comments

I am interested in how the auditory and motor systems interact and influence each other, especially, how sound influences motor learning and memory formation, and what neuronal mechanisms and plastic changes underlie those processes. In particular, I am interested in how the gained knowledge could be used to treat disorders related to the motor and auditory systems, such as in the case of stroke, speech disorders, or schizophrenia.

Megha Sharda, PhD

Megha Sharda, PhD

Posted by: on Sep 8, 2014 | No Comments

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in the Auditory Brain And Cognitive Development Laboratory.

Supervisor: Dr. Krista Hyde

Benjamin Schultz, PhD

Benjamin Schultz, PhD

Posted by: on Jul 17, 2014 | No Comments

Benjamin Schultz was previously a post-doctoral fellow, working with Prof. Caroline Palmer from November 2012 to June 2014. He received a Bachelor of Arts (2006) and Bachelor of Health Sciences (2008) in Psychology from the University of Adelaide, a PhD (2012) in Auditory Psychology from the MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney (Prof. Catherine J. Stevens), and a PhD (2012) in Cognitive Psychology from the Université de Lyon 2 (Prof. Barbara Tillmann). His primary research interests include how people learn rhythmic sequences, entrain and move to the beat, and coordinate their actions with others. In particular, he is interested in how people adapt the acoustic properties and the timing of sound productions in response to those of others in speech and music. Benjamin’s current project with Prof. Isabelle Peretz investigates beat deafness and aims to understand the neural underpinnings of beat-based entrainment.

Patrice Voss, PhD

Patrice Voss, PhD

Posted by: on Sep 6, 2012 | No Comments

Patrice Voss received his PhD degree in psychology in 2009 from the University of Montreal, working under the supervision of Dr Franco Lepore.  He is currently a McGill post-doctoral researcher working with Dr Robert Zatorre at the MNI and BRAMS. Using several brain imaging tools (fMRI, DTI, VBM) and several behavioral variables (sound localization, pitch and melody discrimination), his research aims to identify the functional and anatomical correlates of enhanced auditory and tactile abilities observed in blind individuals, and to better ascertain the specific impact of the age of onset of blindness on both the brain and behavioral adaptations.

Patrice Voss currently holds a Canadian Postdoctoral Banting Fellowship (June 2012-May 2014)

Marion Cousineau, PhD

Marion Cousineau, PhD

Posted by: on Sep 6, 2012 | No Comments

Marion Cousineau received her Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology in 2010 from Université Paris Descartes and Ecole normale supérieure, where she worked under the supervision of Daniel Pressnitzer in the “Laboratoire de Psychologie de la Perception”.

Her dissertation was entitled “Psychophysical measurement of auditory sequence processing“, and investigated the specificity of pitch sequences in normal hearing listeners, and pitch-sequence impairment in cochlear implant listeners.

She is curretly a post-doctoral researcher at BRAMS, Université de Montréal, under the supervision of Isabelle Peretz. In a two-year post-doctoral fellowship funded by the Fyssen Foundation she currently studies the neuro-functionnal origin of the pitch deficit in amusia.

Simon Rigoulot, PhD

Simon Rigoulot, PhD

Posted by: on Sep 6, 2012 | No Comments

Simon Rigoulot‘s research interests center around the neurobiology of emotion processing. He studied Cognitive Neurosciences in France and completed his PhD in December 2008 from University of Lille 2 (Title: “Electrophysiological and behavioral impact of emotional information in peripheral vision”; Rigoulot et al., 2008, 2011, 2012). In 2009, he held an associate teaching position at the University of Lille 1 for one year.

Later on, he investigated emotional modulations of attentional resources using audiovisual stimulations associating emotional prosody to emotional faces, in Prof. Pell’s Lab (Rigoulot et al., 2012, 2014a).

Since 2012, he works at BRAMS under the supervision of Prof. Armony on the brain correlates of the perception of emotional music and how the brain differentiates emotional music from other types of emotional auditory information like vocalizations (screams, cries, laughs,…), emotional speech or prosody (Rigoulot et al., 2015, Rigoulot et al., submitted). As for August 2015, he also works with Pr. Sarah Lippé on the impact of stress on neuropsychological development by studying behavioral and cerebral responses to emotional stimuli in leukemia survivors.