Pierre Jolicoeur, PhD

Pierre Jolicoeur, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 9, 2012 | No Comments

Dr. Jolicoeur is a Full Professor at Université de Montréal (2002-present) where he holds the Canada Resarch Chair in Experimental Cognitive Science and leads an internationally-recognized research program in cognitive neuroscience based on noninvasive brain imaging techniques (EEG, MEG, and fMRI).  He completed a B.Sc. in Psychology at McGill University in 1977 and a Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology at Harvard University in 1982.  He was a faculty member at the University of Saskatchwan (1982-1984) and at the University of Waterloo (1984-2002). Dr. Jolicoeur was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2004 and he is the recipient of the D. O. Hebb Distinguished Contribution Award of the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour, and Cognitive Science for 2009.  He is the Associate Director of the Centre de Recherche en Neuropsychologie et Cognition and the the Director of the MEG Laboratory.

His research is funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Alzheimer Society of Canada, the Canadian Fund for Innovation, the Canada Research Chairs Program, the Fonds de recherche sur la nature et les technologies, and the Fonds de la recherche en santé Québec, and the Quebec Bio-Imaging Network.  His work at BRAMS focuses on auditory attention and auditory short-term memory for basic features of sound.

Krista Hyde, PhD

Krista Hyde, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 9, 2012 | No Comments

Dr Krista Hyde’s research aims at better understanding the behavioral and brain correlates of human complex sound processing (i.e. in music and speech) in both typical and atypical development.

Research themes:

  • Local and global auditory processing
  • Spectral and temporal processing
  • Cross-modal processing (i.e., auditory-motor, auditory-visual)
  • Brain plasticity / training studies
  • Brain connectivity studies

Populations studied (children and adults):

  • typical-development
  • specialized training (i.e. music and dance)
  • developmental disorders: autism spectrum disorders, dyslexia, tone-deafness

Methods used:

  • cognitive and psychophysical measures
  • structural (VBM, DTI, cortical thickness) and functional MRI measures
  • correlational analyses between brain and behavioral/ clinical measures

She is presently Assistant Professor at the Department of Psychology of the University of Montreal and Adjunct Professor at the Deptartment of Psychiatry, at McGill University.

Sylvie Hébert, PhD

Sylvie Hébert, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 9, 2012 | No Comments

Sylvie Hébert has completed a PhD in experimental psychology (neuropsychology) at Université de Montréal in 1996, and a postdoc at Queen’s University in 1998. She is assistant professor at École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie (UdeM) and chercheure-boursière FRSQ since 2000.

Research interests:

  • Mechanisms involved in tinnitus
  • Auditory psychophysics
  • Tinnitus and stress
  • Tinnitus and intolerance to external sounds
  • Tinnitus and sleep
  • Auditory hallucinations
  • Musical dyslexia
Christine Beckett, PhD

Christine Beckett, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 9, 2012 | No Comments

Dr. Christine Beckett’s teaching at Concordia includes ear training, keyboard skills, theory (harmony, counterpoint, analysis, etc.), and surveys of music research. Dr. Beckett has taught within Concordia’s undergraduate curriculum for both Majors (Integrative Music Studies and Electroacoustic Studies); at the Faculty level in FFAR courses for non-Fine Arts students; and as a guest lecturer in graduate programs such as the Diploma in Advanced Music Performance Studies and the Certificate in Music Therapy. Previous to arriving at Concordia, Beckett taught at McGill where she was Chair of Musicianship 2001-2003, and at the Université de Sherbrooke, CEGEPs, Suzuki institutes, and in private studio. Besides teaching, Dr. Beckett enjoys organizing university events such as conferences, special concerts, the Welcome for first year students, and Concordia’s annual Open House.

Dr. Beckett studied music education, composition, and piano/viola performance at the University of Toronto. She then did viola performance and graduate studies in research on ear training at McGill. In 1993, she was the first person to graduate from McGill with a Ph.D. in Music. Dr. Beckett has performed as pianist and string player in various solo and ensemble contexts in North America and Europe.

Dr. Beckett’s research is in the exciting and rapidly-expanding field of music perception and cognition, with studies on: absolute pitch; music reading/dyslexia; issues in ear training; music and emotion; cross-arts studies such as creative strategies of musicians and dancers; oral heritages such as Irish traditional music; etc.

Dr. Beckett is a full charter Faculty member of the International Laboratory for Brain, Music, and Sound (BRAMS), and a member of the BRAMS Board of Directors.

Evan Balaban, PhD

Evan Balaban, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 9, 2012 | No Comments

Species behavioral differences that do not result from exposure to different environments are well-documented, yet little is known about the developmental and evolutionary changes in brains that are responsible for them. Such differences are thought to be due to species differences in “neural default settings” that cause species brains to organize their own development and incoming experiential information in divergent ways. These “predispositions” are important for understanding cognitive development because they provide the scaffolding upon which learning builds complex perceptions, emotions, evaluations and reactions. Our laboratory uses transplants of embryonic brain tissue between two bird species at early stages of development to learn more about the brain mechanisms underlying species behavioral differences. The resulting animals, called chimeras, provide an opportunity to survey the brain for particular regions that, when transplanted between species, will transform the performance of a particular target behavior by the host individuals to the form shown by donor individuals.

We concentrate on auditory communication behaviors, because they are cognitively and socially complex and biologically important. Using transplants in combination with neuroanatomical and electrophysiological techniques, and molecular and metabolic-based methods for imaging brain activity, we identify interacting cell groups in the developing nervous system that make decisive contributions to species differences in the architecture of neural circuits underlying communicative behaviors, and specify the role these regions play in neural and behavioral development. These studies also shed light on the particular developmental mechanisms evolution uses to change brains and behaviors.

A second line of research focuses on neural correlates of human auditory perception. We develop methods for studying changes in ongoing brain activity during the perception of naturalistic time-varying sound sequences such as speech or music, with a particular interest in applying these methods to study the neural mechanisms of pitch perception (prosodic perception in speech), auditory category formation (phonetic categories in speech), and how these mechanisms emerge ontogenetically.

Jorge L. Armony, PhD

Jorge L. Armony, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 9, 2012 | No Comments

Much of our current understanding of stress-related disorders – including Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), phobias, panic attack, and generalized anxiety – comes from studying how the brain processes fear.

Jorge Armony, PhD conducts research on how the brain detects stimuli in the environment that may signal threat or danger, and how this mechanism interacts with other processes, such as consciousness, attention, and memory.

In his quest for answers, Jorge Armony uses several state-of-the-art research techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), behavioral and physiological measures (i.e. skin conductance and heart rate), as well as computational modeling.

He has made significant contributions toward the understanding of psychiatric disorders involving dysfunctions of the fear system. For example, Jorge Armony recently found behavioural and anatomical correlates for the modulation of spatial attention by emotion using a fear conditioning paradigm. These findings further characterized the role of the amygdala in fear processing, as well as defining selective roles for the frontal, parietal, and lateral orbitofrontal cortices in spatial attention.

Robert J. Zatorre, PhD

Robert J. Zatorre, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 9, 2012 | No Comments

Dr. Zatorre, based at the Montreal Neurological Institute, works in cognitive neuroscience.  His research deals with complex auditory perceptual processes, especially the processing of musical sounds and speech. He also works on auditory spatial processes and cross-modal plasticity.  Additional research is concerned with anatomical measures of auditory cortex and its relation to hemispheric asymmetries.  Research methods include functional imaging techniques (fMRI, PET), cortical morphometry, and behavioral-lesion methods in patients with focal brain damage.

Caroline Traube, PhD

Caroline Traube, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 8, 2012 | No Comments

Musicienne et ingénieure de formation, Caroline Traube mène des recherches et enseigne à la Faculté de Musique de l’Université de Montréal, dans le domaine de l’acoustique musicale, de l’organologie, de la psychoacoustique et de l’informatique musicale.

Elle porte un intérêt particulier à l’étude des pratiques musicales et à la recherche-création, tant en interprétation qu’en composition, à l’interdisciplinarité dans les sciences et technologies de la musique et au transfert des connaissances entre les milieux scientifiques et artistiques. Responsable des programmes de mineure et de majeure en musiques numériques, elle travaille à la Faculté de musique au développement d’une musicologie interdisciplinaire, empirique et systématique.

Caroline Traube dirige le Laboratoire informatique, acoustique et musique (LIAM) et est membre de l’OICRM (Observatoire interdisciplinaire de création et de recherche en musique), de l’iACT (institut Arts Cultures et Technologies), du BRAMS (Laboratoire international de recherche sur le cerveau, la musique et le son) et du CIRMMT (Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherche en Musique, Médias et Technologies).

Elle détient un Ph.D. en «music technology» de l’Université McGill, un diplôme d’ingénieur en génie électrique du Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) de l’Université Stanford, et un diplôme d’ingénieur civil (spécialisation en télécommunications) de la Faculté Polytechnique de Mons, Belgique, son pays natal. Elle a par ailleurs étudié la composition électroacoustique au Conservatoire Royal de Mons, avec Annette Vande Gorne, ainsi que le piano pendant une dizaine d’années.

Ses recherches portent notamment sur l’étude du timbre des instruments de musique et des relations entre les caractéristiques physiques de l’instrument, les paramètres du geste instrumental et les attributs perceptifs des sons instrumentaux. Ses travaux de recherche sont régulièrement présentés dans divers colloques et congrès internationaux. Elle a par ailleurs organisé un colloque de musicologie interdisciplinaire (CIM’05) sur le thème du timbre musical et a codirigé un numéro spécial des Cahiers de la Société québécoise de recherche en musique, présentant un ensemble de publications découlant de ce colloque.

Isabelle Peretz, PhD

Isabelle Peretz, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 8, 2012 | No Comments

Dr. Peretz is a cognitive neuropsychologist and a professor of Psychology at the University of Montreal. Dr. Peretz was born and educated in Brussels, Belgium. She earned her Ph.D. in experimental psychology at the Université Libre de Bruxelles under José Morais in 1984. Shortly thereafter she took on a faculty position at Université de Montréal where she has remained ever since. Dr. Peretz’s research focuses on the musical potential of ordinary people, its neural correlates, its heritability and its specificity relative to language. She has published over 175 scientific papers on a variety of topics, from perception, memory, and emotions to performance (for her publications see her personal website).

Dr Peretz is renowned for her work on congenital and acquired musical disorders (amusia) and on the biological foundations of music processing in general. Her research has received continued support from the Canadian Natural Science and Engineering Council and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research since 1986. In 2004, Université de Montréal earned her an endowed Casavant chair in neurocognition of music and in 2006, a Canada Research Chair in neurocognition of music. In 2005, Prof. Peretz became the founding co-director of the international laboratory for Brain, Music, and Sound research (BRAMS). In 2009, she was awarded Prix Justine & Yves Sergent, as well as Prix ACFAS Jacques Rousseau. In 2011, she was awarded the prestigious Neuronal Plasticity Prize (IPSEN Foundation); and in 2012, she received the Adrien Pinard Prize by the SQRP (Société Québécoise pour la Recherche en Psychologie). Dr. Peretz is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and of the American Psychological Association.