Karim Jerbi, PhD

Karim Jerbi, PhD

Posted by: on Sep 28, 2015 | No Comments

Dr. Jerbi is an assistant professor at Université de Montréal (2014-present) where he holds the Canada Research Chair in Systems Neuroscience and Cognitive Neuroimaging (Junior CRC). He leads a interdisciplinary research program that explores the neural substrate of brain function and dysfunction through the application of advanced signal processing and machine learning methods to multi-modal and multi-scale brain data.

He holds a PhD in Cognitive Neuroscience and Brain Imaging (awarded by the University of Paris VI, France) and a degree in Biomedical Engineering (awarded by the University of Karlsruhe, Germany). In December 2012, he completed a Research Director Habilitation (awarded by the Claude Bernard University, UCBL, Lyon I).

Research overview: The focus of Dr. Jerbi’s research is the study of the functional role of neural oscillations and brain-wide network dynamics in human cognitive processes (e.g. perception, intention, action, error and performance monitoring and resting states) and their breakdown in psychiatric disorders. To achieve this, the research conducted in his lab relies on a combination of invasive (intracranial EEG, LFPs, single and multi-unit recordings) and non-invasive (EEG and MEG) recordings. Because his research is rooted in systems neuroscience and neuroimaging, his research and collaboration cover a wide range of cognitive processes, which include among other topics, audition, language, speech and music processing.

Research keywords: neuroscience, neuroimaging, brain networks, connectivity, oscillations, artificial intelligence, brain-computer interfaces, cognition, neurological and psychiatric disorders.

Musical preferences: Chinese man, Sonic Youth, DJ Rupture, John Cage, Aphex Twin, Fela Kuti, The Cure, Gnawa Diffusion…

Denise Klein, PhD

Denise Klein, PhD

Posted by: on Aug 25, 2015 | No Comments

Dr. Denise Klein is a Scientist in the Cognitive Neuroscience Unit at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery and Director of the Centre for Research on Brain Language and Music at McGill University, Montreal. She obtained her Ph.D. at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. Dr. Klein’s thesis research focused on developmental reading problems in bilingual children. Dr. Klein came to the MNI in 1992 as a postdoctoral fellow to work with Dr. Brenda Milner.  Dr. Klein’s arrival at the MNI coincided with the emerging use of functional neuroimaging techniques to study the neural representation of language. Dr. Klein has played a leading role in the development of the MNI’s cognitive neuroscience research program using positron emission tomography (PET) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and more recently, functional MRI, to measure regional changes in cerebral blood flow during the performance of various language tasks. Dr. Klein’s early work pioneered the use of brain imaging for the study of bilingualism. Her research has provided a springboard for current debates about bilingual brain organization. Her findings also have implications for educational policy and for shedding light on optimal periods for early language exposure and learning in child development.

 

About the Language experience and the brain laboratory

Denise Klein, Ph.D., Principal Investigator

Language experience and the brain laboratory at the Montreal Neurological Institute

The main focus in the lab is to explore how our early experience with language impacts the human brain, higher cognitive functions, and learning?  Our research combines behavioral methods with neuroimaging to investigate how neural recruitment is influenced by the age of acquisition/exposure, proficiency in the language, and the distinctive characteristics of languages. We seek to enhance our understanding of critical-period phenomena and neural plasticity in the human brain. The program of research addresses the extent to which the human brain has the capacity to change as a result of learning. Here, we specifically investigate the extent to which the neural patterns are fixed and the extent to which the patterns can be altered later in life. The results of these studies reveal the neural underpinnings of human brain development in relation to the age of language exposure, and they suggest periods when learning language are most optimal in early life.

A second focus in the lab is to use our work based on basic science to develop tools and questions related to presurgical and pre-treatment brain mapping in patients with various neurological disorders. In our lab we use neuroimaging tools to help map out functionally important areas for cognition in patients with focal brain lesions who are about to undergo treatment procedures at the Montreal Neurological Hospital involving cortex bordering on important functional brain areas. Our lab is currently responsible for running a pre-treatment functional brain mapping program at the MNI that integrates anatomical MRI, functional MRI and PET to facilitate preoperative diagnostic procedures in patients with brain lesions such as tumours, epileptic foci and vascular malformations that are in close proximity to areas of the brain that are critical to movement, vision, sensation, or language.

Nathalie Gosselin, PhD, Neuropsychologist

Nathalie Gosselin, PhD, Neuropsychologist

Posted by: on Dec 7, 2012 | No Comments

Nathalie Gosselin, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor at the University of Montreal, Department of Psychology, and a researcher at the International Laboratory on Brain, Music and Sound Research(BRAMS) and CRBLM (Centre for Research on brain, language and music). She focuses primarily on the effect of music on cognition, mood, health, and stress, both in individuals struggling with neuropsychological disorders or mental health problems, than in people without neurological impairment or psychiatric disturbances. Her studies are designed to examine the effects of background music on cognition and are funded by the Québec Research Fund – Company Culture (FQRSC Establishment of new research professors). Dr. Gosselin’s plans to explore the effect of music on stress are funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC Development Knowledge). Finally, her research on the effect of music on posttraumatic stress in patients who suffered a traumatic brain injury are funded by the Consortium for the development of research in trauma (AERDPQ, AQESSS, FRSQ, MSSS, REPAIR, SAAQ).

Nathalie Gosselin’s work with brain-damaged adults has increased understanding of brain organization in recognizing musical emotions. In particular, it demonstrated the key role of the amygdala in the perception of fear evoked by music. She also studies emotional processing across domains, including music, voices and faces. Her postdoctoral research has also carried on the perception of emotions evoked by music, faces and voices in patients with Alzheimer’s dementia.

Nathalie Gosselin is also Neuropsychologist. She was a clinician at the Hôpital Rivière-des-Prairies, a mental health center affiliated with the University of Montreal, where she did neuropsychological assessments with children and adults with various mental disorders (ex., autism spectrum disorder, mood disorder, anxiety disorder, attention deficit disorder). In her work, she was called upon to contribute to the differential diagnosis and to make recommendations to guide interventions. Currently, she is involved in the Psy.D. program. in clinical neuropsychology at the University of Montreal. Her responsibilities include supervising internships in clinical neuropsychology. She also offers services in private neuropsychological assessment. For more information, visit the following website: http://www.musec.ca/

Alexandre Lehmann, PhD

Alexandre Lehmann, PhD

Posted by: on Sep 6, 2012 | No Comments

Alexandre Lehmann, M.Eng., Ph.D., is assistant professor at McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and adjunct professor at University of Montreal’s Psychology Department. He is also a principal member of the CRBLM (Centre for Research on Brain Language and Mind).

Alexandre’s research focuses on cognitive neuroscience of human auditory processing. He has been investigating brain plasticity and sensorimotor integration, both in the neocortex and subcortex, using electro-encephalography. Some of his topics of interests are selective attention, consonance perception, rhythmic entrainment and consciousness. He is currently applying those approaches to investigate performance and rehabilitation in cochlear implant users.

In the line with dynamical accounts of cognition and consciousness such as the oscillatory approach set forth by the enactive framework, he seeks to explore the interplay between subcortical and cortical structures. On the long-term he wishes to combine recent theoretical and technological advances, such as neuro-phenomenology, two-body neuroscience and mobile brain imaging, in order to study ecological situations such as collective dancing, chanting or drumming.

François Champoux, PhD

François Champoux, PhD

Posted by: on Aug 29, 2012 | No Comments

François Champoux earned a master’s degree in psychology from the University of Montreal, an MA from the University of Ottawa Health Sciences (Audiology) and a PhD in Biomedical Sciences (Audiology) at the University of Montreal. He also completed a fellowship in neurology at the Montreal Neurological Institute. He is a member of the College of Speech-Quebec (OOAQ), the Canadian Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists (CASLPA) and the Canadian Academy of Audiology (CAA). François Champoux is currently an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Montreal. He directs the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory located in the School of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology (ÉOA). He is a joint researcher at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal (CRIR), at the site of the Institut Raymond-Dewar (IRD) and the Centre for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognition (CERNEC). In 2012, he was named a scholar in Health Research Fund of Quebec (FRSQ).

Marcelo Wanderley, PhD

Marcelo Wanderley, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 9, 2012 | No Comments

Marcelo M. Wanderley was born in Curitiba, Brazil, in 1965. He holds a B.Eng. degree in electrical engineering from the Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR), Curitiba, Brazil, an M.Eng. degree in integrated analog circuit design from the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianópolis, Brazil, and a Ph.D. degree from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie—Paris VI, Paris, France, on acoustics, signal processing, and computer science applied to music. His main research interests include gestural control of sound synthesis, input device design and evaluation, sensor design and data acquisition, and human–computer interaction. He has published several book chapters and papers in various areas related to new interfaces for musical expression and is the coeditor, with Prof. M. Battier, of the electronic publication Trends in Gestural Control of Music. In 2003 Dr. Wanderley was the Chair of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME03). In 2006, he co-authored (with Eduardo R. Miranda) the textbook “New Digital Musical Instruments: Control and Interaction Beyond the Keyboard”, A-R Editions, the first comprehensive reference on this area. He is currently Associate Professor in Music Technology at the Schulich School of Music, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada.

Sandra E. Trehub, PhD

Sandra E. Trehub, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 9, 2012 | No Comments

My research focuses on (a) music perception in normally developing infants, children, and adults and in deaf listeners with cochlear implants (b) maternal singing and its consequences for infant listeners, and (c) singing development in early childhood.

Marc Schönwiesner, PhD

Marc Schönwiesner, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 9, 2012 | No Comments

I am an Assistant Professor at the BRAMS labs and the Psychology Department of the University of Montreal. I study basic mechanisms of sound analysis in the human brain with functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, and psychoacoustic tests.

List of publications at PubMed  »

Virginia Penhune, PhD

Virginia Penhune, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 9, 2012 | No Comments

My research is focused on understanding the plastic changes in the human brain related to motor learning and expertise. One line of research uses structural and functional MRI to examine the role of motor networks in learning and memory for fine motor skills. We are particularly interested in identifying brain regions involved in learning different movement parameters, in auditory-motor integration and timing, and in the contribution of individual differences in brain structure the ability to learn new skills. The second line of work comprises studies of musical rhythm processing and studies in individuals with musical training. Very importantly, this line of research includes investigation into the interaction of development and experience through studying the impact of musical training at different ages.

 

Caroline Palmer, PhD

Caroline Palmer, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 9, 2012 | No Comments

My research program combines two related issues in cognitive psychology: how people remember long sequences typical of speech and music, and how they produce those sequences. Many theories of memory for speech, written language, pictures, and other human endeavors focus on the problem of serial order: knowing what comes next in a sequence. What most theories do not address is the time course of retrieval: when particular sequential information is available, and for how long. My research focuses on the time course of serial order in music performance, one of the most complex of human skills. Not only must item information be recalled correctly in music, but temporal information (when and for how long events should occur) must also be recalled correctly. My work has established that performers’ memory for musical sequences can be extremely accurate (smaller than 3% error rate), despite the complexity, length, and temporal requirements of music (seeFinney & Palmer, 2003).

One theme of my research addresses the range or scope of planning in sequence production; the range of planning, similar to memory span measures that gauge short-term memory capacity, refers to the span of sequence items that are accessible at a given time during performance (see Palmer, 2005). We have developed a formal theoretical framework for serial recall in music performance that makes time-dependent predictions of the range of planning during production (see Palmer & Pfordresher, 2003), as well as an account of the relationship between speed and accuracy (see Pfordresher, Palmer, & Jungers, 2007). We also address how the scope of planning changes during different stages of skill acquisition (see Palmer & Drake, 1997). Child pianists’ performances indicated skilled-related increases in monitoring one’s own behavior, in anticipating upcoming events, and in generalizing beyond specific motor movements. Comparisons with adult performers indicated these cognitive capacities change most during the first 5 years of skill acquisition, whereas domain-specific knowledge increases across all stages of skill acquisition (see Palmer & Meyer, 2000).

A second theme addresses the motor actions that underlie skilled performance, and properties of goal-directed movement that are specific to individuals. Using motion capture techniques, we record pianists’ finger movements. Dynamic (time-dependent) properties of motion specific to individuals and fingers inform about how personal identity may be rooted in voluntary, goal-directed actions (see Dalla Bella & Palmer, 2006). Motion during sequence production also relects the biomechanical constraints that arise from musicians’ finger and hand movements as they tap on a table (see Loehr & Palmer, 2007), or perform on an instrument (see Palmer, Carter, Koopmans & Loehr, 2007).

A third theme of our research extends our memory findings to understanding how people perceive stable, categorical events in a continuously changing world. Listeners tend to perceive musical sequences as temporally regular; people without any musical training can clap along to continuously fluctuating music with little effort. An ability to perceive temporal regularity is remarkable, given our findings that actual music performances are temporally irregular. We model with dynamical systems approaches how listeners are informed by the temporal fluctuations in music performance, by capitalizing on the systematic nature of the variability (see Large & Palmer, 2002). We have also shown that synchronization of tapping with music is aided by listeners’ sensitivity to phase differences in the onsets of produced and perceived beats (see Loehr, Palmer & Large, 2007). This work indicates that temporal structure is fundamental to understanding how people perceive meaningful units in a continuously varying auditory world, and it offers a primary resource for aiding people’s memory for and learning of auditory sequences