Krista Byers-Heinlein, PhD

Krista Byers-Heinlein, PhD

Posted by: on Jun 26, 2012 | No Comments

My research investigates infant development, with a focus on language acquisition. I use primarily behavioral methods such as eye tracking, looking-time, sucking, and reaching measures. I am particularly interested in infants growing up in bilingual environments and the mechanisms that they use to acquire two languages simultaneously. Some current projects compare speech perception and word learning in monolingual and bilingual infants. A related line of work investigates bilingual parenting, and how the language strategies used by bilingual families influence children’s language learning.

Etienne de Villers-Sidani, MD

Etienne de Villers-Sidani, MD

Posted by: on Feb 10, 2012 | No Comments

Dr. Etienne de Villers-Sidani is a neurologist specializing in cognitive disorders. He has a particular interest in understanding the role of sensory experience and brain plasticity in the emergence and remediation of cognitive impairments. His laboratory uses electrophysiological techniques to determine how sounds and auditory training both shape cortical circuits and alter the perception of sounds, and their use in memory and decision-making. Our main goal is to develop novel therapeutic strategies that can improve cognitive function in patients suffering from conditions related to abnormal sensori-motor processing— dementia, age-related cognitive decline, stroke, traumatic brain injuries, among other conditions. Key to the design of new evidence-based approaches to cognitive rehabilitation is a greater understanding of the basic mechanism of the regulation of brain plasticity. Dr. de Villers-Sidani’s experiments also aim to determine the impact of age on the function and flexibility of brain circuits used in sensory processing. A fundamental objective is to gain a better understanding of the complex interplay that exists between the physical structure of brain circuits and neuronal electrical activity, which is tightly linked to sensory experience and behaviour.

Sarah Wilson, PhD

Sarah Wilson, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 10, 2012 | No Comments

Sarah Wilson is a Clinical Neuropsychologist and research scientist with an interest in the interrelationships between brain processes, cognition and behaviour, and their psychosocial outworkings. This interest has issued two lines of research into the study of brain and behaviour that inform clinical practice: (1) behavioural neuroscience, with a specialty in music neurocognition, and (2) clinical neuropsychology, with a specialty in epilepsy and extensions to other medical conditions.

Her particular interest in auditory processing focuses on auditory perception and cognition and its relationship to other cognitive skills, the neurobiological basis of musical abilities and expertise, the effect of brain injury on music performance (amusia), and the use of music to facilitate cerebral recovery.

Michael Wagner, PhD

Michael Wagner, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 10, 2012 | No Comments

Michael Wagner received his Ph.D. in Linguistics in 2005 at MIT.  After a post-doc in the Department of Brain Cognitive Sciences at MIT, he worked for 2 years as an Assistant Professor at Cornell University. In 2008, he joined the faculty of the Linguistics Department at McGill and has been Canada Research Chair in Speech and Language Processing since 2009. His current research explores how prosody is used to encode and retrieve syntactic and semantic/pragmatic information.

Jérémie Voix, Eng, PhD

Jérémie Voix, Eng, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 10, 2012 | No Comments

Jérémie Voix is an Acoustics Engineer with field experience in industrial noise reduction projects. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in Fundamental Physics from Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille (France), a Master’s degree in Applied Sciences in Acoustics from Université de Sherbrooke and a Ph.D. Doctorate -awarded a Doctorate, with great distinction- from the École de Technologie Supérieure (ETS). Jérémie Voix has been the CTO and VP of Scientific Research at Sonomax Hearing Healthcare Inc where he worked on the development of a “smart earplug”.

In April 2010, he was appointed as an Associate Professor in the Mechanical Engineering department; he now leads the Sonomax-ÉTS Industrial Research Chair in In-Ear Technologies (CRITIAS).

CRITIAS focuses on the development of various technologies designed to complement the human ear, from “intelligent” protection against extreme noise to hearing support and inset hearing diagnostics to the integration of advanced inter-individual communication systems. More fundamental research is also planned, particularly on the micro-harvesting of electrical energy using kinetic or thermodynamic processes integrated within a miniaturized in-ear device, in efforts to address future problems with regard to autonomy.

Daniel Valois, PhD

Daniel Valois, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 10, 2012 | No Comments

Daniel Valois is Professor at the Département de linguistique et de traduction at Université de Montréal where he teaches and conducts research in theoretical syntax, language acquisition and psycholinguistics. He received a PhD in linguistics from UCLA in 1991. His early work aimed at assimilating the structure of noun phrases to that of clauses, especially with respect to adjective/adverb placement and argument structure. Publications on this topic appeared in many refereed journals, including Linguistic Inquiry and the Canadian Journal of Linguistics, as well in Blackwell’s Syntax Companion and other major collective publications. His work has been presented at major conferences such as the North Eastern Language Society (NELS), the West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics (WCCFL), the Generative Linguists of the Old World (GLOW) conference, the Linguistic Symposium on Romance Linguistics (LSRL), Going Romance, and Neurobiology of Language.

He has since developed interests in first language acquisition research as well as in the neurological bases of language (and, more currently, of music and language). Papers on language acquisition appeared inProbusLanguage Acquisition, the Journal of French Language Studies and the proceedings of the Boston Conference on Child Language Development, among others. He has been a member of the editorial board of Probus, a prominent journal of Romance languages, since 1996.

Current projects include ERP analyses of argument structure, nominal agreement and conceptual semantics, the effect of music training on the syntactic competence of language-impaired patients, and the neurological aspects of morphological derivation processing.

Debra Titone, PhD

Debra Titone, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 10, 2012 | No Comments

Prof. Titone is interested in how the brain supports (1) the comprehension of contextualized language (e.g., ambiguity resolution, idioms, metaphors), and (2) the formation of relational memory representations in humans (e.g., transitive inference, configural learning, episodic memory, and other products of normal medial temporal lobe function). Prof. Titone studies these two areas using a variety of cognitive neuroscience techniques including basic cognitive experiments with normal and disordered populations (e.g., schizophrenia, right hemisphere damage patients) and, more recently, neuroimaging methods (e.g., ERPs and fMRI).

Karsten Steinhauer, PhD

Karsten Steinhauer, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 10, 2012 | No Comments

Research interests lie primarily in the areas of psycholinguistics and cognitive neuroscience. Current projects focus on the neural organization and temporal online dynamics of processes underlying language perception, particularly using event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and other brain imaging techniques. This includes interactions among syntactic, semantic, morphological and (overt or covert) prosodic information in listeners and readers, as well as links between speech and music processing. In addition, Dr. Steinhauer’s work addresses issues of bilingualism and second language acquisition in adults, investigating both natural languages and a highly controlled artificial language. A more recent research program investigates the brain mechanisms underlying formal as compared to conceptual semantics, combining ERP and fMRI techniques.

Douglas Shiller, PhD

Douglas Shiller, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 10, 2012 | No Comments

Douglas Shiller is Assistant Professor in the School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology at l’Université de Montréal, and a researcher at the CHU Sainte-Justine Research Centre. His research interests lie in the area of speech production and perception, with a current focus on the role of auditory input in the development and control of speech production in healthy and disordered populations.

Jenny Saffran, PhD

Jenny Saffran, PhD

Posted by: on Feb 10, 2012 | No Comments

How do children acquire their native language? My research focuses on the kinds of learning abilities required to master the complexities of language. Three broad issues characterize my work. One line of research asks what kinds of learning emerge in infancy. A second line of research probes the biases that shape human learning abilities, and the relationship between these biases and the structure of human languages. A third issue concerns the extent to which the learning abilities underlying this process are specifically tailored for language acquisition. Related research concerns infant music perception, and the relationship between music and language learning.