BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Simha Arom & Robert Kaddouch
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Simha Arom & Robert Kaddouch

Publié par: le 15 avril 2020 | Pas de commentaire

Polyphony – Systematics and Ontogenesis

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Mickael Deroche
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Mickael Deroche

Publié par: le 26 mars 2020 | Pas de commentaire

Exploration of brain plasticity in children with cochlear implants using electroencephalography and functional near-infrared spectroscopy

Abstract: Cochlear implants restore a sense of hearing to profoundly deaf individuals. For children who were born deaf, these devices have proven incredibly useful: many acquire spoken language relatively normally and enter mainstream schools. However, global outcomes in terms of academic achievements differ widely between children and we are trying to understand why, by looking at their brain. In this project, we recruited over 50 children (grade 3 to 12), implanted early in life (20 months old) or slightly later (30 months). Along with audiological assessments, all children completed a battery of tests to evaluate their language skills and their reading skills. Furthermore, we recorded their cortical activity using (sequentially) EEG and fNIRS in response to 1) visual processing (checkerboard and visual speech), 2) auditory processing (oddball noises and auditory speech), 3) somatosensory/motor processing (joystick with/without vibration), 4) multi-sensory processing (audiovisual speech and words/nonwords reading and listening), and 5) resting state networks and connectivity (inscapes, or emotional video clip). This presentation will review our findings to date, highlighting evidence for maladaptive cross-modal plasticity caused by a delayed age at (first) implantation.

Short bio: Dr. Deroche is interested in hearing and cognition, using behavioral and neurophysiological techniques. He is originally from France, coming from an engineering background in acoustics. In 2009, he completed his PhD in Cardiff University studying the use of pitch in cocktail-party situations. From 2010 to 2015, he worked at the University of Maryland and at Johns Hopkins, documenting the challenges that users of cochlear implants face with pitch perception and how they translate into further deficits in music and language. In 2015, he moved to Montreal and worked in different centers on a number of projects spanning auditory masking, emotion processing, sensorimotor integration, cognitive load and short-term memory in listeners with impoverished hearing and other populations of interest (musicianship, stuttering). As of 2019, he is Assistant Professor in the Psychology Department at Concordia University. His laboratory investigates processing of speech and music, in healthy and pathological hearing.

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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : STUDENT ACTIVITY – Journal Club discussion of an article

Publié par: le 19 février 2020 | Pas de commentaire

Discussion on Cowen, Alan S., et al. « What music makes us feel: At least 13 dimensions organize subjective experiences associated with music across different cultures » Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2020).

Please see the  article that will be featured during the discussion next week.  Please ensure to read the article prior to the activity for an active participation !

Abstract : What is the nature of the feelings evoked by music? We investigated how people represent the subjective experiences associated with Western and Chinese music and the form in which these representational processes are preserved across different cultural groups. US (n = 1,591) and Chinese (n = 1,258) participants listened to 2,168 music samples and reported on the specific feelings (e.g., “angry,” “dreamy”) or broad affective features (e.g., valence, arousal) that they made individuals feel. Using large-scale statistical tools, we uncovered 13 distinct types of subjective experience associated with music in both cultures. Specific feelings such as “triumphant” were better preserved across the 2 cultures than levels of valence and arousal, contrasting with theoretical claims that valence and arousal are building blocks of subjective experience. This held true even for music selected on the basis of its valence and arousal levels and for traditional Chinese music. Furthermore, the feelings associated with music were found to occupy continuous gradients, contradicting discrete emotion theories. Our findings, visualized within an interactive map (https://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/ ∼acowen/music.html) reveal a complex, high-dimensional space of subjective experience associated with music in multiple cultures. These findings can inform inquiries ranging from the etiology of affective disorders to the neurological basis of emotion.

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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : STUDENT ACTIVITY – Journal Club discussion of an article

Publié par: le 12 février 2020 | Pas de commentaire

Discussion on Sala, G. & Gobet, F. (2020) Cognitive and academic benefits of music training with children: A multilevel meta-analysis

Please see the controversial article that will be featured during the discussion next week.  Please ensure to read the article prior to the activity for an active participation !

L’effet de la musique de fond sur la mémoire – Participant(e)s recherché(e)s

Publié par: le 4 février 2020 | Pas de commentaire

L’effet de la musique de fond sur la mémoire – Participant(e)s recherché(e)s

Pour être admissible, vous devez remplir les critères suivants :
• Avoir entre 18 et 35 ans
• Francophone (ou bilingue)
• Être en bonne santé
• Avoir une audition normale
• Ne pas souffrir de trouble neurologique (ex. épilepsie), psychiatrique (ex. dépression) ni de trouble neurodéveloppementaux (ex. dyslexie)
• Ne pas prendre de médicaments agissant sur le système nerveux central, (ex. antidépresseurs, anxiolytiques, antipsychotiques) depuis au moins 6 mois.

L’étude consiste à faire des tâches à l’ordinateur en écoutant de la musique.
Lieu : L’Université de Montréal (station Édouard-Montpetit)
Durée : Environ 2h30.
Une compensation de 10$ / heure est offerte.

Contactez : labo.musique@gmail.com
**Dans le courriel, inclure votre nom, âge et adresse courriel. Mentionner ‘’Musique-Mémoire’’ dans l’objet du courriel.**

Chercheuse principale : Dre Nathalie Gosselin

CERAS-2015-16-168-D

Étude sur l’acouphène en électrophysiologie

Publié par: le 4 février 2020 | Pas de commentaire

Nous recrutons actuellement des adultes répondant aux critères suivants :

  • être en bonne santé
  • être une femme âgée entre 34 et 36 ans.
  • ne PAS avoir d’acouphène
  • ne pas avoir de surdité sévère dans aucune des oreilles

Pour plus d’informations, veuillez contacter Olivia Scully ou Charlotte Bigras à l’adresse suivante : brams.etude.ga@gmail.com 

Étude supervisée par Sylvie Hébert, professeure titulaire, École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, Université de Montréal  Sylvie.hebert@umontreal.ca

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Noémie Auclair Ouellet
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Noémie Auclair Ouellet

Publié par: le 29 janvier 2020 | Pas de commentaire

Morphosyntactic difficulties in acquired language disorders and their relationship with rhythm processing

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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Keynote Lecture by Dr. Frank Russo

Publié par: le 23 janvier 2020 | Pas de commentaire

SingWell Canada: Understanding group singing in older adults from a biopsychosocial perspective

Frank Russo BRAMS Lecture.mp4

 

BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Claire Pelofi
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BRAMS – CRBLM Lecture Series : Researcher Lecture by Dr. Claire Pelofi

Publié par: le 22 janvier 2020 | Pas de commentaire

Cortical tracking of high-level properties of music

Applications Bourses BRAMS-Mitacs

Publié par: le 15 janvier 2020 | Pas de commentaire

Le BRAMS, en collaboration avec Mitacs, offre 5 bourses de recherche Globalink MITACS-BRAMS pour des étudiant(e)s étrangers(ègeres) sur des projets touchant l’intelligence artificielle (AI), l’apprentissage machine, ou les sciences des données et la musique.