BRAMS – Talk by Simona Brambati
Dans

BRAMS – Talk by Simona Brambati

Publié par: le 23 mai 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Language recovery in post-stroke aphasia

ABSTRACT : Post-stroke aphasia (PSA), i.e. difficulty producing and/or understanding language, is caused by a perturbation of cerebral blood flow within the brain language network, generally due to an ischemic stroke in the left middle cerebral artery (MCA).

Mathieu Roy, PhD
Dans

Mathieu Roy, PhD

Publié par: le 22 mai 2019 | Pas de commentaire

We currently have a good understanding of the mechanisms by which noxious stimuli are encoded in the periphery and transmitted to the brain, but little is known about how those nociceptive signals ultimately cause our subjective experience of pain: the age-old mind-body problem! However, for pain this is more than a just philosophical question since an increased understanding of the cerebral mechanisms giving rise to pain could have important implications for treatment. Why do certain people seem to suffer from excruciating pain in the absence of injury? How can certain people tolerate severe pain without taking any pain killers? While certain brain structures may be, perhaps, necessary for experiencing pain, it seems that no single structure is at the same time both necessary and sufficient for pain. Rather, pain seems to emerge from large-scale interactions between several brain regions – the hallmark of consciousness.

My lab and I are tackling these important questions using a variety of brain imaging (MRI, EGG, MEG) and psychological/psychophysiological methods (pain ratings, response times, decision-making, nociceptive flexion reflexes, skin conductance responses, facial EMG, heart rate, cortisol, etc.). Our research projects also span across a more clinically-oriented axis and a more fundamental research axis. Projects with patients with chronic pain investigate topics such as the role of the central nervous system in the effects of physical exercise training on pain, brain predictors of the transition from acute to chronic pain, as well as brain markers of chronic pain and their potential relationships with other genetic and epigenetic markers of chronic pain. Projects in cognitive neuroscience investigate phenomena such as the interactions between pain and cognition, pain and emotions, the effects of music on pain, how we learn to predict and avoid pain, and how we take decisions between and competing rewards.

The effect of music on pain is a topic that has fascinated me since my Ph.D. at UdeM with Isabelle Peretz and Pierre Rainville. We published one of the first experimental studies on the effects of pleasant and unpleasant music on pain (Roy et al., 2008), and I am now starting to renew with this cherished topic. Current and future projects will include manipulations of music-induced analgesia with pharmacological or cognitive-motivational interventions in order to understand the mechanisms mediating the effects of music on pain. We hope that an increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying music-induced analgesia will help improve its efficacy, and favor its adoption in medical settings to the benefit of patients undergoing painful medical procedures or suffering from chronic pain.

CRBLM Scientific Day
Dans

CRBLM Scientific Day

Publié par: le 13 mai 2019 | Pas de commentaire

 

SAVE THE DATE

The 2019 CRBLM Scientific Day will be held in May. The keynote speaker has been confirmed as Kate Watkins, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Oxford. More details to follow!

1er colloque étudiant CIRMMT-OICRM-BRAMS
Dans

1er colloque étudiant CIRMMT-OICRM-BRAMS

Publié par: le 9 mai 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Les comités étudiants du CIRMMT, de l’OICRM et du BRAMS s’unissent afin de vous convier à la première édition d’un colloque étudiant interdisciplinaire et interuniversitaire regroupant les membres des trois centres de recherche sous la thématique « Rencontres, collaborations et interdisciplinarité dans la recherche en musique ».

BRAMS – Talk by Séverine Samson
Dans

BRAMS – Talk by Séverine Samson

Publié par: le 24 avril 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Music synchronization and social interaction in Alzheimer disease

Abstract: Multitudes of studies support that musical interventions in patients with neurodegenerative studies, in particular with Alzheimer’s disease, positively affect various domains of their wellbeing – emotional, cognitive, and behavioural – and, also reduce the distress of caregivers.

BRAMS – Talk by Samuel Mehr
Dans

BRAMS – Talk by Samuel Mehr

Publié par: le 15 avril 2019 | Pas de commentaire

A natural history of song

Theories of the origins of music claim that the music faculty is shaped by the functional design of the human mind. On these ideas, musical behavior and musical structure are expected to exhibit species-wide regularities: music should be characterized by human universals. Many cognitive and evolutionary scientists intuitively accept this idea but no one has any good evidence for it.

13ième Journée scientifique du Département de psychologie
Dans

13ième Journée scientifique du Département de psychologie

Publié par: le 3 avril 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Le BRAMS sera un partenaire de la journée scientifique annuelle de la Université de Montréal. La Journée scientifique annuelle se veut une occasion pour les étudiants de s’initier au monde des congrès et conférences scientifiques. Chaque année, plus de 400 étudiants y participent, et plus d’une centaine d’étudiants y présentent leurs travaux de recherche. Des conférenciers spéciaux sont invités à tous les ans. Cet année Margaret E. Morris, Chercheure senior, Intel, Professeur associée, Department of human centered design and engineering, University of Washington est la conférencière invitée. Pour plus d’informations sur sa conférence « Left to our own devices: technology insights from a clinical psychologist« , SVP voir le PDF ci-joint Margie_Morris_-_Annonce.

Concordia Music Therapy student visit
Dans

Concordia Music Therapy student visit

Publié par: le 28 mars 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Stephen Venkatarangam, music therapist, who is teaching Psychology of Music at Concordia, will be visiting BRAMS for a talk and a short experimentation.

 

Simone Falk, PhD
Dans

Simone Falk, PhD

Publié par: le 19 mars 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Dans ma recherche, j’examine l’interface entre le langage et la musique. Mes projets concernent les fonctions de la prosodie, en particulier sa dimension rythmique, dans la communication, l’acquisition du langage et ses pathologies. Mon approche est caractérisée par l’interdisciplinarité en appliquant les méthodes provenant de diverses disciplines (linguistique expérimentale, neurosciences (ex., EEG), sciences cognitives, sciences du mouvement).

L’objectif central de mon programme de recherche est d’examiner le rôle des prédictions rythmiques et temporelles dans le traitement du langage afin de :

  1. caractériser les troubles du langage chez l’enfant et l’adolescent et de mieux comprendre les différences individuelles pendant le développement ;
  2. révéler le rôle des prédictions (temporelles) dans la compréhension du discours, la coordination verbale et motrice entre locuteurs ;
  3. collaborer avec les professionnels de l’orthophonie pour développer de nouvelles approches et méthodes d’intervention dans la pathologie du langage basées sur l’entrainement musical, le chant et l’interaction rythmique.
Démonstration d’un système EMG portable
Dans

Démonstration d’un système EMG portable

Publié par: le 28 février 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Des représentants de la compagnie DELSYS  seront au BRAMS pour faire une démonstration d’un de leur système EMG portable (Trigno™ Wireless System).