Pauline Tranchant
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Pauline Tranchant

Publié par: le 24 juillet 2019 | Pas de commentaire
Simona Maria Brambati, PhD
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Simona Maria Brambati, PhD

Publié par: le 11 juillet 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Dre Brambati détient un Ph. D. en Médecine Moléculaire (profil Neuropsychologie Cognitive) de Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele à Milan, en Italie (2006). Elle a par la suite complété un post-doctorat au Memory and Aging Center (University of California, San Francisco) (2006-2007), puis au Centre de recherche de l’IUGM (2007-2011). Elle est aujourd’hui chercheuse au Centre de recherche de l’IUGM et professeure sous octroi au Département de Psychologie de l’Université de Montréal.

Dre Simona Brambati

 

Samuel A. Mehr, PhD
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Samuel A. Mehr, PhD

Publié par: le 11 juillet 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Samuel Mehr is a Research Associate in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University, where he directs the Music Lab. Sam studies music: how the design of the human mind leads us to perceive, create, and engage with music, and how this psychology of music may be leveraged to improve health outcomes in infancy and adulthood. These questions are multidisciplinary, drawing insights from the cognitive sciences, evolutionary biology, anthropology, ethnomusicology and music theory, linguistics, and computer science. Originally a musician, Sam earned a B.M. in Music Education from the Eastman School of Music before diving into science at Harvard, where he earned an Ed.D. in Human Development and Education under the mentorship of Howard Gardner, Elizabeth Spelke, and Steven Pinker.

http://s.mehr.cz/

 

Charlotte Bigras
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Charlotte Bigras

Publié par: le 2 juillet 2019 | Pas de commentaire
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Olivia Scully

Publié par: le 2 juillet 2019 | Pas de commentaire
Dans

Victoria Duda, PhD

Publié par: le 11 juin 2019 | Pas de commentaire
BRAMS – Talk by Simona Brambati
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BRAMS – Talk by Simona Brambati

Publié par: le 23 mai 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Language recovery in post-stroke aphasia

ABSTRACT : Post-stroke aphasia (PSA), i.e. difficulty producing and/or understanding language, is caused by a perturbation of cerebral blood flow within the brain language network, generally due to an ischemic stroke in the left middle cerebral artery (MCA).

Mathieu Roy, PhD
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Mathieu Roy, PhD

Publié par: le 22 mai 2019 | Pas de commentaire

We currently have a good understanding of the mechanisms by which noxious stimuli are encoded in the periphery and transmitted to the brain, but little is known about how those nociceptive signals ultimately cause our subjective experience of pain: the age-old mind-body problem! However, for pain this is more than a just philosophical question since an increased understanding of the cerebral mechanisms giving rise to pain could have important implications for treatment. Why do certain people seem to suffer from excruciating pain in the absence of injury? How can certain people tolerate severe pain without taking any pain killers? While certain brain structures may be, perhaps, necessary for experiencing pain, it seems that no single structure is at the same time both necessary and sufficient for pain. Rather, pain seems to emerge from large-scale interactions between several brain regions – the hallmark of consciousness.

My lab and I are tackling these important questions using a variety of brain imaging (MRI, EGG, MEG) and psychological/psychophysiological methods (pain ratings, response times, decision-making, nociceptive flexion reflexes, skin conductance responses, facial EMG, heart rate, cortisol, etc.). Our research projects also span across a more clinically-oriented axis and a more fundamental research axis. Projects with patients with chronic pain investigate topics such as the role of the central nervous system in the effects of physical exercise training on pain, brain predictors of the transition from acute to chronic pain, as well as brain markers of chronic pain and their potential relationships with other genetic and epigenetic markers of chronic pain. Projects in cognitive neuroscience investigate phenomena such as the interactions between pain and cognition, pain and emotions, the effects of music on pain, how we learn to predict and avoid pain, and how we take decisions between and competing rewards.

The effect of music on pain is a topic that has fascinated me since my Ph.D. at UdeM with Isabelle Peretz and Pierre Rainville. We published one of the first experimental studies on the effects of pleasant and unpleasant music on pain (Roy et al., 2008), and I am now starting to renew with this cherished topic. Current and future projects will include manipulations of music-induced analgesia with pharmacological or cognitive-motivational interventions in order to understand the mechanisms mediating the effects of music on pain. We hope that an increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying music-induced analgesia will help improve its efficacy, and favor its adoption in medical settings to the benefit of patients undergoing painful medical procedures or suffering from chronic pain.

CRBLM Scientific Day
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CRBLM Scientific Day

Publié par: le 13 mai 2019 | Pas de commentaire

 

SAVE THE DATE

The 2019 CRBLM Scientific Day will be held in May. The keynote speaker has been confirmed as Kate Watkins, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Oxford. More details to follow!

1er colloque étudiant CIRMMT-OICRM-BRAMS
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1er colloque étudiant CIRMMT-OICRM-BRAMS

Publié par: le 9 mai 2019 | Pas de commentaire

Les comités étudiants du CIRMMT, de l’OICRM et du BRAMS s’unissent afin de vous convier à la première édition d’un colloque étudiant interdisciplinaire et interuniversitaire regroupant les membres des trois centres de recherche sous la thématique « Rencontres, collaborations et interdisciplinarité dans la recherche en musique ».